Colon Cancer: When Medical Treatments Did Not Cure Them

The past few weeks, many patients came to us with problem of colon-rectal cancer. Let us share with you some of the cases. We hope the experiences of these patients could provide us some lessons. Perhaps we don’t have to travel the same road that they took!

Case 1: Stage 4 Colon Cancer – surgery and chemo. Kidney problem and told to go for more chemo?

Dear Dr Teo,

My name is SL, aged 50 this year and I am from Singapore. I am writing to you in hope that you can provide me with medical advice regarding my condition.

I was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April 2015. Since then, I have gone through an operation to have a stoma attach to my stomach and had received 8 chemotherapy sessions. The first 6th treatment, I was still able to take the side effects, but the 7th chemo treatment onward, I felt relatively weak.

After the last treatment and a CT scan, the oncologist told me that there is a swelling on my left kidney and was referred to the urologist. The urologist told me that the disease has pressed on my urinary tract which require an operation to have a permanent stoma bag for my urine. I am not comfortable with that idea as I am currently having a stoma bag for my solid waste, which has caused me a great due of stress. I told him that I will observe and monitor my situation first. The oncologist has also advise me to go for 2 more chemo treatment again with a different drug as my cancer marker had increase from 40 plus to 60 plus. The initial scan shows 1000 over and has significantly decrease to now. I am dishearten that I would need to go through chemotherapy again.

I am stuck at a crossroad now and I am seriously considering my next medical approach to recovery. I was introduced and recommended by one of a church member with regards to the medical services you provide at your center. I wish that it can be possible for me to receive treatment from you but I would like to hear from you first of your views to my condition.

I look forward to your reply. Thank you. Yours Sincerely. 

Reply:  Sorry SL, it is indeed very, very hard for me to say anything. The chemo has done a lot of damage to your body and your kidney. It is difficult for  me to repair such damage. Honestly, I really don’t know what to say. To go for more chemo?  — for what? But to tell you not to go for chemo is also not right. I suggest that you pray and ask God for guidance. Let Him guide you. And then follow what God tells you in your heart. If you want to know more about what I do, go to

Dear Dr. Teo,

I  have read up on the herbal therapy done at your clinic. After praying about it, I feel that it would be best for me to visit your clinic. I will be able to show you my medical reports and I hope you can advise me if I am suitable to receive treatment from you or not. If it’s possible, I would like to arrange for an appointment with you. Thank you.

Reply: Yes, you are welcome to come and see me Monday to Friday at about 11 a.m. You can come in the morning and return in the evening /afternoon. Let me know.

Case 2:  Meaningless Decline of CEA and Shrinkage of Liver Tumour After Chemotherapy
Patient 2 (P2) is 67 years old. His problems started in October 2014, when he had constipation and later passing out stools with blood. A colonoscopy was done which showed that he had colon cancer.

P2 underwent surgery.  Unfortunately, the cancer had spread to his liver. P2 had 5 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin. At the same he also took Xeloda for 5 cycles.

After chemotherapy, the CEA dropped and the tumour in his liver shrunk. Bravo!

But this great news did not last long. Soon afterwards, the CEA climbed up again and there were more and bigger tumours in his liver and other parts of the body.

Date CEA
8 January 2015 61.5 H – before chemotherapy
2 March 2015 38.2 H – while on chemo
4 May 2015   8.8 H
13 July 2015 10.7 H  – did more chemo!
19 October 2015 87.0 H  – more chemo, change drugs
CT scan 8 January 2015 – before chemotherapy 27 April 2015 – after 5 cycles of chemotherapy 11 August 2015 – before going for 2nd round of chemotherapy
1. There are hepatic hypodensities see in segments 6/7.

2. Largest is in segment 6 measuring 3.8 x 2.4 cm.

3. A new segment 7 lesion seen.

4. There is a nodule in the left inguinal canal.

5. There is a soft tissue mass present between the left 10th and 11th rib, suspicious of a metastatic deposit.

6. There is NO soft tissue thickening at the anastamotic site and laparotomy scar to suggest local recurrence.

1. Hypodensisties in segments 6 and 7 of the liver are all smaller. These are suspicious of metastases. No new lesion is seen.

2. A metastatic nodule to the right intercostal node is also smaller.

3. Left inguinal soft tissue suspicious for peritoneal spread of disease is also smaller.

4. No recurrence is seen at the bowel anastomic site.

  1. Interval increase in the number and size of liver hypodense lesions.

2. New hypodense lesions in segment 8/6, segment 4a/8, and segment 6/7.

3. Small left inguinal hernia with stable enhancing peritoneal thickening, suspicious for peritoneal metastasis.

4. No enhancing mass at the bowel anastomosis to suggest local recurrence.

Since surgery and the first round of chemotherapy did not cure P2, the doctor suggested more chemotherapy! Starting in August 2015,  P2 received another 3 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin + oral Xeloda.  Unfortunately, these treatment was not effective. The CEA started to climb higher, from 10.7 in July to 87.0 in October 2015.

The doctor decided to change to another chemo regime. This time, P2 received Irinotecan + oral Xeloda. The doctor was not sure how many cycle P2 had to undergo with this regimen.

P2 said after the chemo:

  • The first week, he had no appetite and was tired.
  • The second week. he regained 50 percent of his wellbeing.
  • The third week, overall regained 80 to 90 percent of his health.

Since P2 showed during his consultation with us that he was still going to chemotherapy, we suggested that he goes home first and do not take any of our herbs.

Later, we received this e-mail from P2.

In your book you mentioned that those undergoing chemo can take capsule A and B to reduce the side effects.
Can I do that now ? I am more tired and the nausea lasted longer than before

Reply: If you want to continue taking the chemo — go ahead and complete your chemo first. When they cannot do anything else for you, then come and see me again. No use trying to make your own combination of treatment. Either you follow your doctor or you follow me.

Case 3: Surgery, chemo, radiation – the cancer spread to his lung 

In May 2014, I received an email below:

Dear Dr Teo,

Thank you very much for your kindness in helping the cancer patients.

My colleague (57 years old) had just underwent rectal tumour operation and he is very worried that he might have to go for chemotherapy or radiotherapy. For your information he is diagnosed with rectal cancer stage II. We would like to go to Penang to get consult you.

We met P3 and prescribed him with herbs. We also told him to take care of his diet, change his high-pressured-lifestyle and take it easy. During our meeting, P3 also told us that he was going to undergo dendritic cell therapy to be administered with a doctor whom he knows. The treatment originated from Japan and the whole treatment would cost something like RM 65,000.  Although I did not object to what he wanted to do, I told him about another patient who had similar treatment. He had lung cancer. Started the dendritic cell therapy in Singapore – it was a failure. He then flew to Japan and continued with more dendritic cell therapy. He died.

P3 apparently took our herbs and took care of his diet. Initially we saw P5 two or three times but after that he “disappeared from our radar.”

Later, we received this email.
Dear Prof. Dr. Chris Teo,

My blood test result is bad and is increasing daily

  • 19 May 2014 before undergoing dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 1.4.

I started consuming herbal medicine given by CA Care.

  • 4 July 2014 after completion of 6 X 4 jab (24 jabs) of dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 11.3
  • 9 July 2014 go for second opinion CEA was even higher 13.4 

This is very worrying and I am very concerned about metastatic spread. Please help.  How to stop the CEA to increase soonest.

I’ve just done my colonoscopy again this afternoon and the surgeon told me that the intestine is joining up well at my rectum and tomorrow morning at 11 am he is going to do the surgery by rejoining the intestine to my stomach and seal the hole. Expected to be admitted for a week. Best Regards.

P3 was again out of our radar, not until November 2015.  This is the email.

Dear Dr Teo,

It has been 15 months that since we last wrote to you.  How are you Dr Teo?  I wish that you are always in good health.  I still read your stories, write-up on your web-site.  Your kindness in helping the patients is greatly appreciated.

Patient  has been doing chemotherapy since August 2014 and has been monitored by the doctor closely.  However, recently he was informed by the doctor that the cancer cell had spread from the rectum (stage 4) to right lung.

We do not know what to do now as we think that he has been in the good hand all this while. Dr Teo,  please let us have your advice. Thank you very much.  

 Note: Chemotherapy since August 2014:

  • From 5-August 2014, chemo drugs used: oxaliplatin + 5FU + Avastin.
  • 13-10-2014, done IMRT (Intensity-modulated radiation therapy) for 6 weeks.
  • After IMRT, continued with chemo — Avastin, 5FU. Still ongoing.
  • 28-9-2015, had needle radiotherapy (radiofrequency ablation) because of 2 tiny spots on the right lung.
  • 19-10-2015, oxaliplatin was introduced again and 5 FU still on.

Since August 2014 the CEA was always higher than normal range and CEA dropped to within normal range in May 2015.  But for the past two months, the CEA was going up again.  His recent CEA was 14.7. 

Awaiting your comment please.

Case 4: Surgery and Xeloda did not stop this colon cancer from recurring

As we were dealing with many cases of colon cancer, a friend (P4) dropped by our centre. He is 70 years old and was diagnosed with rectosigmoid cancer in October 2014.

Chee LSeng Colon

P4 underwent a surgery and the histopathology report indicated a Duke Stage B cancer with no spread to the nodes or other parts of the body. After the discharge from the hospital, P3 was given oral chemo-drug, Xeloda which he took faithfully.

Barely a year later, October 2015, the cancer recurred. P4 underwent another surgery. The histopathology report confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, recurrent in the abdominal wall.

Now, what is P4 going to do now? He had two options: Go back to his doctor and undergo chemotherapy. Or, he come to us and opt for non-medical management of his cancer. P3 decided not to undergo further chemotherapy.

Let me ask you to reflect on these two quotations:

Insanity both

7 Repeating-error-over-and-ov

Let me end by sharing with you one case which fortunately seldom happen at CA Care — a patient who does not want to share his story.

P5 is a man in his early 50s. He flew in from Singapore to seek advice about his colon cancer. As he sat down to talk, he requested that this consultation should not be video-taped. I assured him that there is no need to worry — we would not stop our video-tapping but we would not use “his” video conversation with us.

I casually asked him: How do you come to know about us?

His answer: I went into your website and read the articles your wrote. I also watched the videos you put up in the You Tube!

My response: Oh you know about us because other patients would not mind sharing their stories, and I wrote their stories and used their videos in the website. But when it comes to your turn, you would not want to allow others to know about you!

P5 started to tell his story. Basically, he had problems of his bowel movements which he ignored for some time.  When things got worse, he decided to go to the hospital for help. Colonoscopy showed a big tumour in his colon. The doctor wanted him to undergo radiotherapy and chemotherapy first. These have to be done with the hope of shrinking the tumour first before proceeding with surgery.

P5 was not happy with the doctor’s suggestion. He would not want to go for chemotherapy or surgery. After learning about us, he decided to fly all the way from Singapore to see us. He was hoping to take our herbs and the tumour will go away. My answer to him: That is wishful thinking and “madness.” I have no such magic bullet. Go home and see your doctor. Let him remove the tumour first. After your surgery, you can come back again if you think I can help you.

Before leaving, P5 asked, How much do I have to pay for this consultation? I responded:  Pay nothing!

Having documented these cases, we have two other colon cancer stories to share with you. These two patients are unique in their own ways. And they are the kind of patients who made our day! Watch out for them:

  1. Conversation with a 34-year-old with colon cancer.
  2. Conversation with a 82-year old with colon cancer.

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Radiation and Hormonal Therapy Did Not Cure Her. Xeloda made her miserable! Patient, Only You Should Decide What You Want To Do!

Mdm PG was 59 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in June 2009. She immediately underwent a right mastectomy. Histology report indicated:

  • Three lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma.
  • Focal lympho-vascular invasion is seen at the periphery of the 2 small lesions.
  • Resection margins, skin and nipple are not involved by tumour.
  • 4 out of 13 axillary lymph nodes contain metastatic carcinoma, with focal extracapsular spread.
  • pT2N2aMx, Stage 3A

Prognostic factors:

  • Oestrogen receptor –   Moderate reactivity
  • Progesterone receptor –   Moderate reactivity
  • C-erb-B2 –  No reactivity
  • P53 –  Weak reactivity

PG underwent follow up chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She was also on Fermara (for 5 years). At the same time, she started to take herbs. The following is a brief summary of her treatment progress (extracted from the e-mails from her daughter).

May 2013 – almost 4 years after diagnosis

My mum is doing extremely well and I thank God every day for you and His protection over my mum’s life.  My mum recently went for her blood test and check-up again.  The doc said that her bones are getting brittle due to the regular intake of this hormonal pill that she has been taking every day for the past 3 years to keep her condition under control.  It is one of the side effects of this pill.  He is advising her to go through a kind of treatment to strengthen her bones.

I found out the name of the bone strengthener that the doc recommended to my mum.  It’s called “Zometa.”  It is an injection.  The hormonal pills that she has been taking is called ” Femara.”

October 2013

I would like to update you with regards to my mum’s latest blood test.  Her tumor marker is 5.9.  Her usual is 3.5.

January 2014

I would like to give you an update of my mum’s latest tumor marker result.

CEA 7.1  H
CA 125 29.4  H
CA 15.3 24.1  H

Her CEA is out of the normal range and it has escalated from 5.9  last Oct to 7.1 this week.  Both her CA125 and CA15.3 have also gone up even though it is still within the normal range.

The doc is suggesting for mum to go for a pet scan to find out the problem.

My sis and I are personally not so comfortable with her having to go through another cycle of invasive treatment should we find out if there is another growth elsewhere in her body.  We are really hoping that we can help treat mum’s condition with your herbs and diet advise.

February 2014

I’ve attached my mum’s latest report to show it to you.  The doctor said that there is a relapse and the lymph nodes behind her lungs are affected but there is no spreading to her organs which is a good thing.

The doc has changed her oral medication to Tamoxifen because her Fermara  doesn’t work anymore.  She recently went for a jab to protect her bones from turning brittle.

May 2014

Tumor markers on 7 May 2014
CEA 13.5  H
CA 125 64.5  H
CA 15.3 33.5  H

My mum went for her medical appointment yesterday. Result is negative. ..conditions of marker has worsen. Doc said there is a high chance of relapse but he doesn’t know which spot … could be bone, liver or kidney. If my mum does not wish to find out the cause, the doc can’t prescribe proper medication for treatment but he will change her current medication to see if there is any improvement upon her next visit on 19th June.
The doctor explained that the life span of such case if the patient refuses finding and treatment,  usually won’t pull through. The cancer cells will multiply very fast within a year and she will not make it.

Mum’s tumour marker in January this year comparing to now has escalated from  a marker of 7 to 14 now and another two marker have also increased from positive range now all to negative range. She is  physically very well but result has shown otherwise.

Doc suggested mummy to go for PET scan to at least find out what’s the problem so we can seek early treatment since she is still healthy now. And not wait till she turns fragile and can’t proceed with any more treatment.

March 2015

My mum’s cancer marker has apparently gone up quite a bit recently and the doc said that there are tumours growing quite rapidly in her body that explains why the cancer marker is high. The doc asked if my mum has been taking any other medication that is causing interference with his. And he immediately changed my mum’s medication from tamoxifen to Exemestane Aromasin 25mg per tab and he is trying to see if the new medication can help control her tumour  growth.

The nurse warned my mum about all the side effects. My sister advised my mum to stop taking your herbs and see if there is any improvement with the western medication alone because she also believes that there could be that possibility of your herbs clashing with the oncologist’s prescription. I personally am against the idea of my mum stopping your herbs temporarily.

Doc mentioned since last year that cancer has spread to her bones and there are tumours found around her chest outside her lungs and other parts of her body too. He said it was a good thing that it didn’t spread to her organs. I’m a little worried that my mum will eventually feel the adverse side effects of her new medication if she continues with it and not take your herbs. I’m really concerned.. Anyways, no matter what the doctor said and her deteriorating condition, my mum is still in high spirits and her appetite is well and she still goes to church and play mahjong with her friends regularly like a healthy person. Her strong belief in God keeps her in good spirits too.

June 2015

I am wondering if I can bring my mum to come see you on. She has been taking Xeloda for the past one month and the sole of her feet started to turn black since last week.  I am not sure if it is due to Xeloda.  Would love to show you her feet. Blood test also showed that her glucose level is very high.  So I am not sure if she could be diabetic.

Not sure if Xeloda is the culprit? Just read the internet.

Side effects of Xeloda: Hand-Foot Syndrome

Hand-foot syndrome, also called palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, is a side effect of some types of chemotherapy.  In mild to moderate hand-foot syndrome, the following symptoms may occur on the palms of the hands and/or the soles of the feet:

  • Redness (similar to a sunburn)
  • Swelling
  • A sensation of tingling or burning
  • Tenderness (sensitive to touch)
  • Tightness of the skin
  • Thick calluses and blisters on the palms and soles

Symptoms of severe hand-foot syndrome include:

  • Cracked, flaking, or peeling skin
  • Blisters, ulcers, or sores on the skin
  • Severe pain
  • Difficulty walking or using the hands

The drugs that may cause hand-foot syndrome include:

  • Axitinib (Inlyta)
  • Cabozantinib (Cometriq)
  • Capecitabine (Xeloda)
  • Cytarabine (Cytosar-U)
  • Docetaxel (Docefrez, Taxotere)
  • Floxuridine (FUDF)
  • Fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil)
  • Idarubicin (Idamycin)
  • Liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil)
  • Doxorubicin (Adriamycin)
  • Sunitinib (Sutent)
  • Sorafenib (Nexavar)
  • Pazopanib (Votrient)
  • Paclitaxel (Taxol)
  • Vemurafenib (Zelboraf)
  • Regorafenib (Stivarga)

Not everyone who is treated with these medications develops hand-food syndrome. The severity of hand-foot syndrome can vary from person to person, even among people taking the same medication for the same form of cancer.


Lisa Bonchek Adams  was 37 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. After all the medical treatments in one of the world’s best cancer hospitals (in New York), she died in March 2015.  In her blog, Lisa wrote about her experience with Xeloda:

… the end of the (chemo) round ended up bringing hand/foot syndrome  from the Xeloda. Hand/foot syndrome is not the same as neuropathy (though it may include some of those symptoms), which many people on chemotherapy experience.Hand/foot syndrome is associated with a few particular drugs, Xeloda is one. The capillaries in your hands and feet leak and/or rupture, causing the chemo to spill into the extremities. This causes them to be extremely red, swollen, painful, sensitive to touch, cracked, peeling, and potentially ulcerating. Numbness and tingling also accompany the condition.For the past month I’ve been trying to keep these effects at bay, but eventually the toxicity builds up. Fine motor activities like tying shoes are hard at the moment, anything that touches/puts pressure on hands and feet. Thankfully I have some shoes with furry insides and cushioning. Socks must be worn 24/7 and slippers at all times. Holding the steering wheel is uncomfortable but doable, thankfully …

Our Meeting and Advice

We got to meet Mdm PG and her daughter in mid-June 2015. GP looked great but she felt miserable inside. She told us that she did not suffer any effects taking Xeloda during the first week. After the second week things started to get worse. She had sores in her mouth, both hands and soles peeled making walking difficult. Then she felt “tired” throughout the day.  She was not able to continue living the “good life” she had earlier on.

The daughter said, “before the Xeloda she was okay. Able to walk about, taking the bus anywhere she wanted to do. She can spend time playing mahjong, etc. Now she can’t do that anymore. She look good and healthy before that. But the doctor said, she was not healthy because the blood test was bad. Now, after the Xeloda her blood result was better, but she was feeling bad.”

PG reminded us that when she was diagnosed with (Stage 3) cancer, the doctor told her that she could last about 3 years if she did all the treatments. Now, it is already 6 years. She believed the herbs did help her. But now living such a miserable life after Xeloda, life has not much meaning anymore.

PG told us that she has 2 daughters – both love her very much and wanted her to live as long as possible. But unfortunately, these  2 daughters  have their own ideas about her treatment. One daughter wanted to strictly the doctor’s treatment while another daughter wanted her to go for herbs and was not happy with all those medical drugs. PG said, they started to “quarrel in front of me and that left me in a limbo — not knowing what to do and who to please!”

Indeed, we have “sensed” this feeling all along when we read the many emails the daughter wrote us. So, this meeting was a good opportunity for us to give our advice frankly and directly. These are what I told PG:

  • You have already understood that nobody on earth can cure cancer. Even with medical treatment the doctor already told you would only last 3 years. Now, it is 6 years. Look at it in a positive way. You have been well blessed. During these years, you did not suffer and have lived a good life (unlike now due to Xeloda). PG responded, I am aware of this. I have been taking your herbs and I felt well. Your herbs helped me a lot.
  • If you can eat, can sleep, can move around and have no pain, please don’t ask for more. Be ever grateful to God for this.
  • No one lives forever, even for those who are supposed to be healthy. One day, I too would return “home.” So let us not fear death because no one can escape this reality. I have read many books of people who have “gone” and saw “heaven” and came back to earth. They said, Up There, it is so beautiful – calm and peaceful, free from all miseries. So why are we so afraid to go there?  Don’t be afraid.
  • We fully understand the dilemma you are in — trying to please both daughters, but each wanting you to take a different path. I am afraid I cannot decide for you and tell you what to do. You will have to make your own decision. Let each of your daughter know what is important for you in life. Tell them how you feel and they must respect your wishes.
  • If you feel that you want to endure all the suffering undergoing more medical treatments, go ahead and tell your daughters you want to do exactly that. If you cannot endure these sufferings and want to just go on herbs, say that out clearly to your daughters. Your daughters should respect and honour your wishes.
  • You need to tell your daughters that what you want to do, is entirely your decision and they should not feel guilty or responsible for whatever the outcome. In this way, there would be “peace.”
  • The last thing — which is a real disaster — to have family members quarrelling among themselves.

23 June 2015

Thank you so much for taking time out to see my mum and I the other night.We are eternally grateful. Words cannot describe how grateful I am. I can never repay your kindness. My sis will still be bringing my mum to see the oncologist the next few days. Hopefully she will make a firm decision and not be swayed by their persuasion. She is recovering well, Dr.


5 July 2015

Hi Dr Chris,

Guess what?  My mum has decided not to continue with the Chemo treatment anymore.  She told my family and her friends that she will depend solely on your herbs to help stabilise her condition.  Praise The Lord!  She is very diligent in taking your herbs everyday now.





Colon Cancer: Oncologists said,” Try chemo.” But one doctor said, “If he is my relative, I won’t put him through the torture.”

TS (E211) is a 58-yer-old gentleman. On 28 January 2013 he went to see a doctor for abdominal pain, distention and bleeding.  His CEA was normal, at 2.5 but his liver enzymes were elevated: AST = 45, ALT = 29 (normal), Alkaline phosphatase = 137 and GGT = 79. His white blood cell count was at 12.9 (high).

A CT scan indicated an irregular mass at the rectosigmoid region measuring about 6.1 cm in length. It caused narrowing of its lumen. “Features are suggestive with carcinoma rectum with local infiltration and liver metastases.”

Rectum tumour biopsy confirmed infiltrating moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma.

TS underwent surgery on 31 January 2013. Due to the cancer infiltrating the small bowel with perforation and intra-loop abscess, TS was fitted with an temporary ileostomy bag.

TS was referred to an oncologist and was prescribed oral drug, Xeloda plus Leucovorin. TS completed two cycles of these without problem. However, after the third cycle, he started to feel the side effects. He had rashes and dry itchy skin. He became tired, had muscle pains and problems with the taste buds.

By the fourth cycle (i.e., in early July 2013) the muscle pains became worse and he was not able to walk. The doctor advised to take a longer break before going for the next cycle. TS decide to stop the drugs.

On 1 August 2013, TS had shortness of breath during the early morning and was rushed to the hospital. He was said to have a heart attack. He responded well to the emergency treatment in the ICU.

On 2 August 2013, a chest X-ray indicated left lung pneumonia and TS was treated with antibiotics. CT scan of the thorax suggested lung metastases.

From 4 to 7 August 2013, TS’s condition worsened day by day. He was short of breath and needed oxygen all day. His mental alertness was sharply reduced, drifting in and out of sleep most of the time. He had no appetite and felt weak and drowsy. Three doctors attended to him. Two doctors suggested TS undergo chemotherapy but another specialist whispered to TS’s wife, “If he is my relative, I won’t put him through the torture.”  Since the family had bad experience with the Xeloda, they decided to give up chemotherapy.

On 8 to 9 August 2013, TS was still on antibiotics and these were the most critical 2 days. His breathing became very difficult and he was not able to eat. His condition deteriorated drastically and the family were expecting the worse. The pastor came to give the last rites. According to the wife, “He was almost gone”.

From 10  to 12 August 2013, by the grace of God, TS’s condition improved and he was discharged from the hospital since there was not the doctor could do after declining chemotherapy. TS was brought home in an ambulance to “rest” .

At home, TS was under the care of Hospice. The Hospice doctor was told that the family wanted to try herbal therapy. The doctor was understanding enough and said, “It is your choice. You can try but I don’t think it will work.”

20 September 2013. TS his wife and daughter came to CA Care, Penang.

Listen and watch the videos below carefully.




On 29 April 2014, TS wrote:
1. My skin peeled off months ago and new skin have grown at least 6 months ago.
2. I am now experiencing pain when I stand up. When walking my legs feel heavy.
3. I feel numb from stomach area downwards.
4. The Hospice doctor told me my nerves are damaged as a side effect from previous oral chemo Xeloda.

I will plan to visit you asap. God bless.

On 1 May 2014, TS wrote again:

I am now into the 8th month of taking your herbs and capsules. Eat ok, sleep ok, bowel movement now 2-3 times a day. When I came back from the hospital last August my weight was 45kg. Now it is almost 49kg. So there is improvement except for the numbness and pain in my soles when I walk.

Before  undergoing any treatment, patients should always ask yourself or your doctors!

1. What are the side effects of the Xeloda?

The most common side effects are:




sores in the mouth and throat (stomatitis),

stomach area pain (abdominal pain),

upset stomach,


loss of appetite,

and too much water loss from the body (dehydration).

Other common side effects are:

hand-and-foot syndrome (palms of the hands or soles of the feet tingle, become numb, painful, swollen or red);


dry, itchy or discolored skin;

nail problems;

hair loss;






pain (including chest, back, joint and muscle pain);

trouble sleeping;

and taste problems.

Patients could have more side effects related to their heart. The cardiotoxicity observed with Xeloda includes:

myocardial infarction/ischemia,



cardiac arrest,

cardiac failure,

sudden death,

electrocardiographic changes,

and cardiomyopathy.

With the above list of side effects, nobody can tell you what you may end up with if you swallow Xeloda. It’s a matter of your luck – you strike gold or misfortune. So that much about the so-called scientifically proven medicine.

Ask these questions.

1. In August, TS had a “heart attack” after completing 3 cycles of Xeloda a month before that. What triggered that “heart attack”? Cardiotoxicity mentioned above? Was TS warned about this before taking the drug? Or does everyone assume Xeloda is perfectly safe since the doctors prescribe it? This heart episode almost killed TS.

2. When you are told you have cancer, we understand that you are desperate. You don’t know what else to do. You need help – but don’t you think it is wise not to add oil immediately to the burning fire? Don’t you want to hold on for a while so that you can read a bit more rather than blindly follow advice – to be seen to do something immediately?

3. One amusing account is what the “open-minded, understanding” Hospice doctor said. He did not object to herbal therapy, but he weight in and said, “It is your choice. I don’t think it will work, but you can try.” A fair statement. From the view of medical science, herbs are just hocus pocus, unproven snake oil, bla, bla.

But looking at it realistically, for this case and many other cases documented in this website, did TS ever get worse by taking the herbs and NOT doing chemo? If herbs can do what the chemo cannot do, why go for chemo then?

Watch the videos again.

Can you learn something from this case? Or are you still wanting to stick to your biased view that herbs are not effective and unproven? Do you want to still say, “I don’t think it will work”?

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Tamoxifen and Xeloda failed her!

DK (S-542) is a 63-year old lady from Sumatera Selatan. She found a lump in her right breast. She ignored it for about 3 to 4 years since it did not give her any problem. In July 2008, she started to have pain and the lump grew bigger.

Two years later, in November 2010, DK went to a hospital in Melaka (Malaysia). She was asked to undergo an operation. She was afraid and went home instead. Then she sought alternative treatment.  She went to Central Java and sought the help of a herbalist who gave her herbs to apply and also “massaged” her. The treatment expelled pus and blood from her breast. For the first 6 months, the treatment seemed to help DK.

Since she felt well, DK went to China for a holiday. While in China, she suffered severe pain and her condition deteriorated. On her return to Indonesia she was admitted to a hospital in Jambi. CT and biopsy were performed. DK subsequently underwent 7 cycles of chemotherapy, followed by a mastectomy. After surgery, DK was put on Tamoxifen and Xeloda. She was on these two drugs for about 7 to 8 months. After 2 months on the drug, her  right arm became swollen and a big blister developed (Picture A). She had difficulty bending her fingers (Picture B).


DK stopped taking Tamoxifen and Xeloda. She went back to see her doctor again in February 2014. The doctor prescribed painkiller. By this time there was also a swelling in her neck (Picture C). The doctor told her there was nothing he could do to help her. Desperate, DK’s son found us in the internet. On 7 March 2014, DK, her husband and son came to seek our help.


DK was prescribed Capsule A, C and D. In addition she was asked to drink herbal teas: Breast M, Lympho 1, Upper Edema and Pain Tea.

One Month On The Herbs

DK’s son came to report his mother’s progress on 9 April 2014.

1. DK did not seem to have any reaction after taking the herbs for the first 3 days.

2. On day 4 after taking the herbs, DK had severe pain in her right arm. The pain lasted untill 1 or 2 a.m. Her right leg felt sore and numb.

3. She passed out black stools with a lot of mucus. After that she passed out stools with oily discharge.

4. One week on the herbs, the pains in her right arm became less, soreness in her right leg also lessened.

5. Before the herbs, DK was on morphine, 2 tablets per day. After a week on the herbs, she did not need morphine anymore.

6. Two weeks on the Upper Edema tea, the swelling of her right arm improved. It became smaller and soft (previously hard).  But after stopping the Upper Edema tea, the swelling came back.

7. DK was able to sleep well throughout the night. Previously she could sleep for only about 2 hours each night.

8. Her appetite had improved and she could eat rice.

9. She had more energy.



Comments: There are many lessons we can learn from DK’s bitter experience.

1. Ladies, if you have a lump in your breast. it is prudent for you to go and get an ultrasound done and determine if the lump is benign or malignant. If it is malignant, it makes no sense to keep it in your breast. Don’t be fooled by those who want you to believe that their “treatment” can cure you. I have heard of the Kiss Therapy, Leech Therapy, etc. which did not work. There is no reason for you to delay removal of the cancerous breast. The longer you wait the more problems you are going to create for yourself later on. Like in DK’s case, she delayed and delayed but ended up having to remove her breast anyway. By that time it was too late.

2. If you go and see your doctors with a large lump in your breast,  the first thing they would want to do is chemo you! DK had to endure 7 cycles of chemo before a mastectomy was performed. If she was to go and see the doctor earlier she would not need to do the chemo at all – proceed straight to lumpectomy or mastectomy.

3. After the mastectomy, DK was put on Tamoxifen and Xeloda and she was on these drugs for about 7 to 8 months. This is something that blew my mind off. Why Xeloda? Why Tamoxifen? Can someone not learn from simple observation? Learn from DK’s experience (and many others like her) that these drugs  have never been shown to cure cancer! In DK’s case, things got worse, not better.

4. When DK went back to her doctor for more help, she was only given Morphine tablets, nothing else. The doctor told her son, “There is nothing else I can do to help your mother!” At least the doctor was being honest. Perhaps other doctors would suggest, “Do more chemo!” But the question to ask is: Can more chemo cure this metastatic cancer?  Before Amy Cohen Soscia died, she left this remark for the world to learn, “There is no cure for metastatic breast cancer. It never goes away. You just move from treatment to treatment.”

5. As usually, at this “terminal stage” when there is nowhere else to go, patients come to seek our help. In spite of this dire situation, some expect us to cure them — see how absurd or illogical it is! But some patients come hoping that we can help them attain a better quality life with no pain. Yes, this is more realistic and as in DK’s case (and numerous other cases like hers) we are able to help.  So even if your doctors give up on you (like DK), know that there is still another option for you to get well. So don’t give up. That is, if you are prepared to help yourself.

6. Unfortunately, not all patients who come to us  want to help themselves. They expect healing to come easy! Or they want healing on their own terms. Many just want to sit in the comfort of  their home and expect us to “deliver healing via e-mail.”

Let me point out to you what DK and her family had to go through to come to us. They live in a town that takes 7 hours to drive to Jambi. From Jambi they have to take a plane to Jakarta and from Jakarta they have  to fly to Penang. In all, the one way journey from home to Penang takes 2 days!

We often have requests to have phone consultation because patients live “far away and cannot come.” When we ask from where? Ah, the answer is BM, Taiping or Ipoh (just one or two hours ride across the Penang bridge) or even Singapore (one hour and a half by plane). For those who what to find easy healing, our advice is to find someone near your home to help you. It is more convenient for you.

7. Following our healing path is not like going for a honeymoon trip. First, you must take full responsibility for your health. Change your lifestyle. Change your diet. You need to brew the teas and drink the bitter concoctions ( Some people ask, why not have them in capsules?). Probably for a week or two after taking the herbs, you have to go through a “healing crisis.” You may have more pain, more discomforts, etc. After this healing crisis you will probably feel better, as in the case of DK and many others like her. To learn more about healing crisis, click this link:

8. Most patients who come to us often claim that they are ignorant — “I don’t know.” “We panic, we are confused and don’t know what to do.” “They never tell me all these things.”

In order to educate patients, I have written another book on breast cancer (below):

Cover Front Your Breast  Bk1Bk2 RGB

(Available at

This book provides you with all the essential information that you need to know and tell you exactly what to do if you have a lump in your breast, etc. etc. Pleading ignorance is no excuse. You have a choice. And your life is in your hands. Do what is right.

Colon-Lung Cancer: Surgery, Twenty-seven Cycles of Chemo and SGD 100,000 Did Not Cure Her

Sar (S12) is a 63-year-old lady from Indonesia. She was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer in 2008. Her daughter wrote, “ It was a shocking news. We decided to bring mom to Singapore to get the best possible treatment.”

Sar underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection for localized rectal cancer in April 2008. Four of 15 nodes were infected with cancer. Histopathology report confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma – pT2N2. Sar did not receive any chemotherapy after the surgery.

About a year later, in June 2009, during a follow-up, the doctor detected her CEA was rising. Further investigation showed the cancer had spread to her lungs. Sar underwent chemotherapy. The regimen used was Xelox-Avastin (Capecitabine or XELODA +Oxaliplatin + Bevacizumab or AVASTIN). Sar received 6 cycles of this treatment. According to her doctor, the treatment helped stablised her disease. Unfortunately, such “fortune” did not last long. In less than a year, the cancer showed progression.

In January 2010, Sar underwent more chemotherapy. This time the regimen used was FOLFIRI + Avastin (Irinotecan + 5-FU + Lecovorin + Bevacizumab).  She received a total of 8 cycles of this chemo. Again, according to her doctor, the treatment stablised her disease.  But the doctor also suggested another new drug, Cetuximab (or Erbitux) to be added to the treatment regimen. But Sar could not afford the extraordinary high cost of this drug.

FOLFIRI + Avastin did not help Sar. The cancer continued to progress. In October 2010, a clinical trial comparing Cetuximab (or Erbitux) and panitumumab (or Vectibix) opened at Johns Hopkins Singapore.  Sar participated in this trial from November 2010 to June 2011. She received a total of 13 cycles of the treatment at Johns Hopkins. Sar had initial response. But that turned out to be meaningless because later the cancer started to progress.

A PET scan evaluation on 26 July 2011 showed lung metastases as well as lymph node involvement in the mediastinum and para-aortic region. The conclusion: “Overall findings indicate disease progression on comparison with the previous PET study.”

Sar was asked to undergo more chemotherapy. On 29 July 2011, she and her two daughters came to seek our help.  We prescribed her some herbs for her colon and lung. Unfortunately we do not get to see them again after this.

The only news we got was what we read in her daughter’s blog, “In total she (mom) has undergone 27 x chemo with three different drugs plus almost a SGD 100,000 loan. The debt is really pressurizing for her and her family who are average income earners. As for mom, she is still surviving in a fairly good condition and now taking herbs since the last chemo had stopped responding.”


It is indeed sad to hear such a story.  Patients and their family went to the “best” for their medical treatment but the “best” failed them. But such a story is not an exceptional story – or is it a norm that happens most of the time? The conclusion is yours to make.

What saddened me most when dealing with cancer patients is their “lack of knowledge.” We can understand if patients are illiterate and therefore have to depend entirely on others – the “experts” to help them deal with their problems. But if you are able to read what I am writing now – then it would be most unfortunate indeed if you still choose to remain “uneducated”, ignorant or “blind”.

Let me pose some questions for you to ponder on.

  1. Her daughter wrote, “We decided to bring mom to Singapore to get the best possible treatment.”  The patient received the best treatments alright – and the most expensive treatment as well? But what about the outcome? Did she get the best outcome?
  2. Do you still believe that money can “buy” the cure for cancer? I am reminded of what I wrote in the website earlier.  Click this link, and you can read about the case of Tony Snow. I gave that article the title – the World’s most well fought battle… Why? This is because the man involved in this battle against colon cancer, Tony Snow, used to walk along the corridor of power in the most powerful political office on earth. He lost his battle against colon cancer and died. Did he not get the best – the best doctors, the best hospital and the “best” support from the most powerful man on earth? Why did he die? And if you have time, browse through the  same website and  learn for yourself why many patients who did not get the “best” still survive their colon cancer.
  3. Did it ever occur to you that before you undergo invasive treatment such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy that you should ask your doctors if these treatments would cure you cancer? Most people don’t ask – they assume that since they get the best, the treatment outcomes would also be the “best”. I always remind patients – ask what the chances of you getting a “cure” are before you undergo any treatment. If you want make sure that you speak the same language like your doctor.  Cure means getting rid of your cancer altogether, not just “remission” or buying of time. If the “expert” you are dealing with do not give you a clear cut convincing answer, you might want to seek a second or third opinion from different sources. Weight out the pros and cons before you decide on the path to take.
  4. In this case, Sar was given 6 cycles of  Xelox-Avastin. Did it ever occur to you to check with reliable sources what these drugs can or cannot do for patients with lung metastases? Does Avastin ever cure lung metastasis? How effective is the Xelox regimen for metastatic colon cancer?

You can get all these answers if you spend enough time at your computer. Or do you prefer to remain blind and ignorant. For some the easy way out is to be ignorant – after all this is what they often say, ignorance is bliss.

If you have some money to spare, why not get some books and read. Take for example this one, Read what the author, a medical doctor said about chemotherapy for colon cancer.

  1. After Xelox-Avastin had failed. Sar underwent more chemo. But this time following the FOLFIRI + Avastin regimen.  Is this not doing the same old thing over and over again? Different combination of poisons but the mindset remains the same. This is what Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”
  2. Avastin seems to be popular. And it is also expensive.  Exclusive and expensive stuff must be good, right?  If you read this article, you will learn that a cycle of Avastin plus another drug cost about S$12,000. But is Avastin effective for cancer? You judge for yourself.
  3. From the internet, information on the effectiveness of Avastin and other expensive chemo-drugs are readily available. To get you started, just click the links below. From there, I wish you a happy journey – go, read more!

This is what her son wrote,

“My mom’s oncologist told us her cancer had recurred and if she does chemo it will extend her life by another six months, and if lucky another twelve months.  But the oncologist does not recommend chemo and thought the treatment would make her worse. He suggested waiting until her condition becomes painful or other symptoms appear. He told us chemotherapy does not cure her cancer and it does not make much difference.”