Colon Cancer: Oncologists said,” Try chemo.” But one doctor said, “If he is my relative, I won’t put him through the torture.”

TS (E211) is a 58-yer-old gentleman. On 28 January 2013 he went to see a doctor for abdominal pain, distention and bleeding.  His CEA was normal, at 2.5 but his liver enzymes were elevated: AST = 45, ALT = 29 (normal), Alkaline phosphatase = 137 and GGT = 79. His white blood cell count was at 12.9 (high).

A CT scan indicated an irregular mass at the rectosigmoid region measuring about 6.1 cm in length. It caused narrowing of its lumen. “Features are suggestive with carcinoma rectum with local infiltration and liver metastases.”

Rectum tumour biopsy confirmed infiltrating moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma.

TS underwent surgery on 31 January 2013. Due to the cancer infiltrating the small bowel with perforation and intra-loop abscess, TS was fitted with an temporary ileostomy bag.

TS was referred to an oncologist and was prescribed oral drug, Xeloda plus Leucovorin. TS completed two cycles of these without problem. However, after the third cycle, he started to feel the side effects. He had rashes and dry itchy skin. He became tired, had muscle pains and problems with the taste buds.

By the fourth cycle (i.e., in early July 2013) the muscle pains became worse and he was not able to walk. The doctor advised to take a longer break before going for the next cycle. TS decide to stop the drugs.

On 1 August 2013, TS had shortness of breath during the early morning and was rushed to the hospital. He was said to have a heart attack. He responded well to the emergency treatment in the ICU.

On 2 August 2013, a chest X-ray indicated left lung pneumonia and TS was treated with antibiotics. CT scan of the thorax suggested lung metastases.

From 4 to 7 August 2013, TS’s condition worsened day by day. He was short of breath and needed oxygen all day. His mental alertness was sharply reduced, drifting in and out of sleep most of the time. He had no appetite and felt weak and drowsy. Three doctors attended to him. Two doctors suggested TS undergo chemotherapy but another specialist whispered to TS’s wife, “If he is my relative, I won’t put him through the torture.”  Since the family had bad experience with the Xeloda, they decided to give up chemotherapy.

On 8 to 9 August 2013, TS was still on antibiotics and these were the most critical 2 days. His breathing became very difficult and he was not able to eat. His condition deteriorated drastically and the family were expecting the worse. The pastor came to give the last rites. According to the wife, “He was almost gone”.

From 10  to 12 August 2013, by the grace of God, TS’s condition improved and he was discharged from the hospital since there was not the doctor could do after declining chemotherapy. TS was brought home in an ambulance to “rest” .

At home, TS was under the care of Hospice. The Hospice doctor was told that the family wanted to try herbal therapy. The doctor was understanding enough and said, “It is your choice. You can try but I don’t think it will work.”

20 September 2013. TS his wife and daughter came to CA Care, Penang.

Listen and watch the videos below carefully.

 

 

 

On 29 April 2014, TS wrote:
1. My skin peeled off months ago and new skin have grown at least 6 months ago.
2. I am now experiencing pain when I stand up. When walking my legs feel heavy.
3. I feel numb from stomach area downwards.
4. The Hospice doctor told me my nerves are damaged as a side effect from previous oral chemo Xeloda.

I will plan to visit you asap. God bless.

On 1 May 2014, TS wrote again:

I am now into the 8th month of taking your herbs and capsules. Eat ok, sleep ok, bowel movement now 2-3 times a day. When I came back from the hospital last August my weight was 45kg. Now it is almost 49kg. So there is improvement except for the numbness and pain in my soles when I walk.
Comments:

Before  undergoing any treatment, patients should always ask yourself or your doctors!

1. What are the side effects of the Xeloda?

The most common side effects are:

diarrhea,

nausea,

vomiting,

sores in the mouth and throat (stomatitis),

stomach area pain (abdominal pain),

upset stomach,

constipation,

loss of appetite,

and too much water loss from the body (dehydration).

Other common side effects are:

hand-and-foot syndrome (palms of the hands or soles of the feet tingle, become numb, painful, swollen or red);

rash;

dry, itchy or discolored skin;

nail problems;

hair loss;

tiredness;

weakness;

dizziness;

headache;

fever;

pain (including chest, back, joint and muscle pain);

trouble sleeping;

and taste problems.

Patients could have more side effects related to their heart. The cardiotoxicity observed with Xeloda includes:

myocardial infarction/ischemia,

angina,

dysrhythmias,

cardiac arrest,

cardiac failure,

sudden death,

electrocardiographic changes,

and cardiomyopathy.

With the above list of side effects, nobody can tell you what you may end up with if you swallow Xeloda. It’s a matter of your luck – you strike gold or misfortune. So that much about the so-called scientifically proven medicine.

Ask these questions.

1. In August, TS had a “heart attack” after completing 3 cycles of Xeloda a month before that. What triggered that “heart attack”? Cardiotoxicity mentioned above? Was TS warned about this before taking the drug? Or does everyone assume Xeloda is perfectly safe since the doctors prescribe it? This heart episode almost killed TS.

2. When you are told you have cancer, we understand that you are desperate. You don’t know what else to do. You need help – but don’t you think it is wise not to add oil immediately to the burning fire? Don’t you want to hold on for a while so that you can read a bit more rather than blindly follow advice – to be seen to do something immediately?

3. One amusing account is what the “open-minded, understanding” Hospice doctor said. He did not object to herbal therapy, but he weight in and said, “It is your choice. I don’t think it will work, but you can try.” A fair statement. From the view of medical science, herbs are just hocus pocus, unproven snake oil, bla, bla.

But looking at it realistically, for this case and many other cases documented in this website, did TS ever get worse by taking the herbs and NOT doing chemo? If herbs can do what the chemo cannot do, why go for chemo then?

Watch the videos again.

Can you learn something from this case? Or are you still wanting to stick to your biased view that herbs are not effective and unproven? Do you want to still say, “I don’t think it will work”?

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Tamoxifen and Xeloda failed her!

DK (S-542) is a 63-year old lady from Sumatera Selatan. She found a lump in her right breast. She ignored it for about 3 to 4 years since it did not give her any problem. In July 2008, she started to have pain and the lump grew bigger.

Two years later, in November 2010, DK went to a hospital in Melaka (Malaysia). She was asked to undergo an operation. She was afraid and went home instead. Then she sought alternative treatment.  She went to Central Java and sought the help of a herbalist who gave her herbs to apply and also “massaged” her. The treatment expelled pus and blood from her breast. For the first 6 months, the treatment seemed to help DK.

Since she felt well, DK went to China for a holiday. While in China, she suffered severe pain and her condition deteriorated. On her return to Indonesia she was admitted to a hospital in Jambi. CT and biopsy were performed. DK subsequently underwent 7 cycles of chemotherapy, followed by a mastectomy. After surgery, DK was put on Tamoxifen and Xeloda. She was on these two drugs for about 7 to 8 months. After 2 months on the drug, her  right arm became swollen and a big blister developed (Picture A). She had difficulty bending her fingers (Picture B).

Composite-Breast-S542

DK stopped taking Tamoxifen and Xeloda. She went back to see her doctor again in February 2014. The doctor prescribed painkiller. By this time there was also a swelling in her neck (Picture C). The doctor told her there was nothing he could do to help her. Desperate, DK’s son found us in the internet. On 7 March 2014, DK, her husband and son came to seek our help.

 

DK was prescribed Capsule A, C and D. In addition she was asked to drink herbal teas: Breast M, Lympho 1, Upper Edema and Pain Tea.

One Month On The Herbs

DK’s son came to report his mother’s progress on 9 April 2014.

1. DK did not seem to have any reaction after taking the herbs for the first 3 days.

2. On day 4 after taking the herbs, DK had severe pain in her right arm. The pain lasted untill 1 or 2 a.m. Her right leg felt sore and numb.

3. She passed out black stools with a lot of mucus. After that she passed out stools with oily discharge.

4. One week on the herbs, the pains in her right arm became less, soreness in her right leg also lessened.

5. Before the herbs, DK was on morphine, 2 tablets per day. After a week on the herbs, she did not need morphine anymore.

6. Two weeks on the Upper Edema tea, the swelling of her right arm improved. It became smaller and soft (previously hard).  But after stopping the Upper Edema tea, the swelling came back.

7. DK was able to sleep well throughout the night. Previously she could sleep for only about 2 hours each night.

8. Her appetite had improved and she could eat rice.

9. She had more energy.

 

 

Comments: There are many lessons we can learn from DK’s bitter experience.

1. Ladies, if you have a lump in your breast. it is prudent for you to go and get an ultrasound done and determine if the lump is benign or malignant. If it is malignant, it makes no sense to keep it in your breast. Don’t be fooled by those who want you to believe that their “treatment” can cure you. I have heard of the Kiss Therapy, Leech Therapy, etc. which did not work. There is no reason for you to delay removal of the cancerous breast. The longer you wait the more problems you are going to create for yourself later on. Like in DK’s case, she delayed and delayed but ended up having to remove her breast anyway. By that time it was too late.

2. If you go and see your doctors with a large lump in your breast,  the first thing they would want to do is chemo you! DK had to endure 7 cycles of chemo before a mastectomy was performed. If she was to go and see the doctor earlier she would not need to do the chemo at all – proceed straight to lumpectomy or mastectomy.

3. After the mastectomy, DK was put on Tamoxifen and Xeloda and she was on these drugs for about 7 to 8 months. This is something that blew my mind off. Why Xeloda? Why Tamoxifen? Can someone not learn from simple observation? Learn from DK’s experience (and many others like her) that these drugs  have never been shown to cure cancer! In DK’s case, things got worse, not better.

4. When DK went back to her doctor for more help, she was only given Morphine tablets, nothing else. The doctor told her son, “There is nothing else I can do to help your mother!” At least the doctor was being honest. Perhaps other doctors would suggest, “Do more chemo!” But the question to ask is: Can more chemo cure this metastatic cancer?  Before Amy Cohen Soscia died, she left this remark for the world to learn, “There is no cure for metastatic breast cancer. It never goes away. You just move from treatment to treatment.”

5. As usually, at this “terminal stage” when there is nowhere else to go, patients come to seek our help. In spite of this dire situation, some expect us to cure them — see how absurd or illogical it is! But some patients come hoping that we can help them attain a better quality life with no pain. Yes, this is more realistic and as in DK’s case (and numerous other cases like hers) we are able to help.  So even if your doctors give up on you (like DK), know that there is still another option for you to get well. So don’t give up. That is, if you are prepared to help yourself.

6. Unfortunately, not all patients who come to us  want to help themselves. They expect healing to come easy! Or they want healing on their own terms. Many just want to sit in the comfort of  their home and expect us to “deliver healing via e-mail.”

Let me point out to you what DK and her family had to go through to come to us. They live in a town that takes 7 hours to drive to Jambi. From Jambi they have to take a plane to Jakarta and from Jakarta they have  to fly to Penang. In all, the one way journey from home to Penang takes 2 days!

We often have requests to have phone consultation because patients live “far away and cannot come.” When we ask from where? Ah, the answer is BM, Taiping or Ipoh (just one or two hours ride across the Penang bridge) or even Singapore (one hour and a half by plane). For those who what to find easy healing, our advice is to find someone near your home to help you. It is more convenient for you.

7. Following our healing path is not like going for a honeymoon trip. First, you must take full responsibility for your health. Change your lifestyle. Change your diet. You need to brew the teas and drink the bitter concoctions ( Some people ask, why not have them in capsules?). Probably for a week or two after taking the herbs, you have to go through a “healing crisis.” You may have more pain, more discomforts, etc. After this healing crisis you will probably feel better, as in the case of DK and many others like her. To learn more about healing crisis, click this link: http://www.cacare.com/healing-crisis

8. Most patients who come to us often claim that they are ignorant — “I don’t know.” “We panic, we are confused and don’t know what to do.” “They never tell me all these things.”

In order to educate patients, I have written another book on breast cancer (below):

Cover Front Your Breast  Bk1Bk2 RGB

(Available at http://www.BookOnCancer.com)

This book provides you with all the essential information that you need to know and tell you exactly what to do if you have a lump in your breast, etc. etc. Pleading ignorance is no excuse. You have a choice. And your life is in your hands. Do what is right.

Colon-Lung Cancer: Surgery, Twenty-seven Cycles of Chemo and SGD 100,000 Did Not Cure Her

Sar (S12) is a 63-year-old lady from Indonesia. She was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer in 2008. Her daughter wrote, “ It was a shocking news. We decided to bring mom to Singapore to get the best possible treatment.”

Sar underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection for localized rectal cancer in April 2008. Four of 15 nodes were infected with cancer. Histopathology report confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma – pT2N2. Sar did not receive any chemotherapy after the surgery.

About a year later, in June 2009, during a follow-up, the doctor detected her CEA was rising. Further investigation showed the cancer had spread to her lungs. Sar underwent chemotherapy. The regimen used was Xelox-Avastin (Capecitabine or XELODA +Oxaliplatin + Bevacizumab or AVASTIN). Sar received 6 cycles of this treatment. According to her doctor, the treatment helped stablised her disease. Unfortunately, such “fortune” did not last long. In less than a year, the cancer showed progression.

In January 2010, Sar underwent more chemotherapy. This time the regimen used was FOLFIRI + Avastin (Irinotecan + 5-FU + Lecovorin + Bevacizumab).  She received a total of 8 cycles of this chemo. Again, according to her doctor, the treatment stablised her disease.  But the doctor also suggested another new drug, Cetuximab (or Erbitux) to be added to the treatment regimen. But Sar could not afford the extraordinary high cost of this drug.

FOLFIRI + Avastin did not help Sar. The cancer continued to progress. In October 2010, a clinical trial comparing Cetuximab (or Erbitux) and panitumumab (or Vectibix) opened at Johns Hopkins Singapore.  Sar participated in this trial from November 2010 to June 2011. She received a total of 13 cycles of the treatment at Johns Hopkins. Sar had initial response. But that turned out to be meaningless because later the cancer started to progress.

A PET scan evaluation on 26 July 2011 showed lung metastases as well as lymph node involvement in the mediastinum and para-aortic region. The conclusion: “Overall findings indicate disease progression on comparison with the previous PET study.”

Sar was asked to undergo more chemotherapy. On 29 July 2011, she and her two daughters came to seek our help.  We prescribed her some herbs for her colon and lung. Unfortunately we do not get to see them again after this.

The only news we got was what we read in her daughter’s blog, “In total she (mom) has undergone 27 x chemo with three different drugs plus almost a SGD 100,000 loan. The debt is really pressurizing for her and her family who are average income earners. As for mom, she is still surviving in a fairly good condition and now taking herbs since the last chemo had stopped responding.”

Comments

It is indeed sad to hear such a story.  Patients and their family went to the “best” for their medical treatment but the “best” failed them. But such a story is not an exceptional story – or is it a norm that happens most of the time? The conclusion is yours to make.

What saddened me most when dealing with cancer patients is their “lack of knowledge.” We can understand if patients are illiterate and therefore have to depend entirely on others – the “experts” to help them deal with their problems. But if you are able to read what I am writing now – then it would be most unfortunate indeed if you still choose to remain “uneducated”, ignorant or “blind”.

Let me pose some questions for you to ponder on.

  1. Her daughter wrote, “We decided to bring mom to Singapore to get the best possible treatment.”  The patient received the best treatments alright – and the most expensive treatment as well? But what about the outcome? Did she get the best outcome?
  2. Do you still believe that money can “buy” the cure for cancer? I am reminded of what I wrote in the website earlier.  Click this link, http://cancercaremalaysia.com/2010/11/20/the-world%E2%80%99s-most-well-fought-battle-against-colon-cancer/ and you can read about the case of Tony Snow. I gave that article the title – the World’s most well fought battle… Why? This is because the man involved in this battle against colon cancer, Tony Snow, used to walk along the corridor of power in the most powerful political office on earth. He lost his battle against colon cancer and died. Did he not get the best – the best doctors, the best hospital and the “best” support from the most powerful man on earth? Why did he die? And if you have time, browse through the  same website and  learn for yourself why many patients who did not get the “best” still survive their colon cancer.
  3. Did it ever occur to you that before you undergo invasive treatment such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy that you should ask your doctors if these treatments would cure you cancer? Most people don’t ask – they assume that since they get the best, the treatment outcomes would also be the “best”. I always remind patients – ask what the chances of you getting a “cure” are before you undergo any treatment. If you want make sure that you speak the same language like your doctor.  Cure means getting rid of your cancer altogether, not just “remission” or buying of time. If the “expert” you are dealing with do not give you a clear cut convincing answer, you might want to seek a second or third opinion from different sources. Weight out the pros and cons before you decide on the path to take.
  4. In this case, Sar was given 6 cycles of  Xelox-Avastin. Did it ever occur to you to check with reliable sources what these drugs can or cannot do for patients with lung metastases? Does Avastin ever cure lung metastasis? How effective is the Xelox regimen for metastatic colon cancer?

You can get all these answers if you spend enough time at your computer. Or do you prefer to remain blind and ignorant. For some the easy way out is to be ignorant – after all this is what they often say, ignorance is bliss.

If you have some money to spare, why not get some books and read. Take for example this one, http://cancercaremalaysia.com/2011/09/02/book-review-money-driven-medicine-%E2%80%93-chemotherapy-for-non-responsive-cancers-%E2%80%93-denying-reality/. Read what the author, a medical doctor said about chemotherapy for colon cancer.

  1. After Xelox-Avastin had failed. Sar underwent more chemo. But this time following the FOLFIRI + Avastin regimen.  Is this not doing the same old thing over and over again? Different combination of poisons but the mindset remains the same. This is what Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”
  2. Avastin seems to be popular. And it is also expensive.  Exclusive and expensive stuff must be good, right?  If you read this article, http://cancercaremalaysia.com/2011/12/27/utero-ovary-lungs-cancer-part-1-she-almost-died-after-spending-two-billion-rupiahs-on-chemotherapy-in-singapore/ you will learn that a cycle of Avastin plus another drug cost about S$12,000. But is Avastin effective for cancer? You judge for yourself.
  3. From the internet, information on the effectiveness of Avastin and other expensive chemo-drugs are readily available. To get you started, just click the links below. From there, I wish you a happy journey – go, read more!

This is what her son wrote,

“My mom’s oncologist told us her cancer had recurred and if she does chemo it will extend her life by another six months, and if lucky another twelve months.  But the oncologist does not recommend chemo and thought the treatment would make her worse. He suggested waiting until her condition becomes painful or other symptoms appear. He told us chemotherapy does not cure her cancer and it does not make much difference.”