Better to Die Than to Suffer

May (not real name) was a 55-year-old lady. Her husband had died of a heart attack three years before, at the age of 62. May was diagnosed with right breast cancer in 2000. She underwent a mastectomy followed by six cycles of chemotherapy. After that she was put on tamoxifen.  Three years later, the cancer spread to the right side of her breast in spite of the fact that she was on tamoxifen all these years. May underwent another six cycles of chemotherapy followed by twenty sessions of radiotherapy at the neck and breast areas. Unfortunately, the cancer spread to her neck. She underwent another four cycles of chemotherapy.

From July 2005 to March 2006, she was put on the oral drug, Femara. Then from April 2006 to July 2006, she was on Xeloda.

Her daughter told us that May suffered unbearable pains. When she could not stand the pains she just took off her clothes and ran around the house. At one time May tried to jump out of the window to commit suicide. The arms and areas of her breasts and shoulders were turgid and hard. She felt hot inside. She decided to give up further medical treatment and sought our help at the end of July 2006. The following pictures can tell a better story about her agony.

Comments

Andrew Weil (in Health and healing) wrote: There is never ending struggle … patients are sucked into same way of thinking … finding themselves more and more dependent on the system giving one treatment after another.

Professor Jane Plant (in Life in your hands) wrote: This sounds like a battle between the disease and the treatments – with the patient as the battle ground …Conventional cancer treatment can process patients to the extent that they no longer understand what is really being done to them.

Dr. Lai Gi-ming, Taiwan Cooperative Oncology Group, National Research Institute said: The thing that most frustrates modern doctors is that, after surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, all they can do is keep chasing and chasing the cancer!

 

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