Colon Cancer: When Medical Treatments Did Not Cure Them

The past few weeks, many patients came to us with problem of colon-rectal cancer. Let us share with you some of the cases. We hope the experiences of these patients could provide us some lessons. Perhaps we don’t have to travel the same road that they took!

Case 1: Stage 4 Colon Cancer – surgery and chemo. Kidney problem and told to go for more chemo?

Dear Dr Teo,

My name is SL, aged 50 this year and I am from Singapore. I am writing to you in hope that you can provide me with medical advice regarding my condition.

I was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April 2015. Since then, I have gone through an operation to have a stoma attach to my stomach and had received 8 chemotherapy sessions. The first 6th treatment, I was still able to take the side effects, but the 7th chemo treatment onward, I felt relatively weak.

After the last treatment and a CT scan, the oncologist told me that there is a swelling on my left kidney and was referred to the urologist. The urologist told me that the disease has pressed on my urinary tract which require an operation to have a permanent stoma bag for my urine. I am not comfortable with that idea as I am currently having a stoma bag for my solid waste, which has caused me a great due of stress. I told him that I will observe and monitor my situation first. The oncologist has also advise me to go for 2 more chemo treatment again with a different drug as my cancer marker had increase from 40 plus to 60 plus. The initial scan shows 1000 over and has significantly decrease to now. I am dishearten that I would need to go through chemotherapy again.

I am stuck at a crossroad now and I am seriously considering my next medical approach to recovery. I was introduced and recommended by one of a church member with regards to the medical services you provide at your center. I wish that it can be possible for me to receive treatment from you but I would like to hear from you first of your views to my condition.

I look forward to your reply. Thank you. Yours Sincerely. 

Reply:  Sorry SL, it is indeed very, very hard for me to say anything. The chemo has done a lot of damage to your body and your kidney. It is difficult for  me to repair such damage. Honestly, I really don’t know what to say. To go for more chemo?  — for what? But to tell you not to go for chemo is also not right. I suggest that you pray and ask God for guidance. Let Him guide you. And then follow what God tells you in your heart. If you want to know more about what I do, go to www.CancerCareMalaysia.com

Dear Dr. Teo,

I  have read up on the herbal therapy done at your clinic. After praying about it, I feel that it would be best for me to visit your clinic. I will be able to show you my medical reports and I hope you can advise me if I am suitable to receive treatment from you or not. If it’s possible, I would like to arrange for an appointment with you. Thank you.

Reply: Yes, you are welcome to come and see me Monday to Friday at about 11 a.m. You can come in the morning and return in the evening /afternoon. Let me know.

Case 2:  Meaningless Decline of CEA and Shrinkage of Liver Tumour After Chemotherapy
Patient 2 (P2) is 67 years old. His problems started in October 2014, when he had constipation and later passing out stools with blood. A colonoscopy was done which showed that he had colon cancer.

P2 underwent surgery.  Unfortunately, the cancer had spread to his liver. P2 had 5 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin. At the same he also took Xeloda for 5 cycles.

After chemotherapy, the CEA dropped and the tumour in his liver shrunk. Bravo!

But this great news did not last long. Soon afterwards, the CEA climbed up again and there were more and bigger tumours in his liver and other parts of the body.

Date CEA
8 January 2015 61.5 H – before chemotherapy
2 March 2015 38.2 H – while on chemo
4 May 2015   8.8 H
13 July 2015 10.7 H  – did more chemo!
19 October 2015 87.0 H  – more chemo, change drugs
CT scan 8 January 2015 – before chemotherapy 27 April 2015 – after 5 cycles of chemotherapy 11 August 2015 – before going for 2nd round of chemotherapy
1. There are hepatic hypodensities see in segments 6/7.

2. Largest is in segment 6 measuring 3.8 x 2.4 cm.

3. A new segment 7 lesion seen.

4. There is a nodule in the left inguinal canal.

5. There is a soft tissue mass present between the left 10th and 11th rib, suspicious of a metastatic deposit.

6. There is NO soft tissue thickening at the anastamotic site and laparotomy scar to suggest local recurrence.

1. Hypodensisties in segments 6 and 7 of the liver are all smaller. These are suspicious of metastases. No new lesion is seen.

2. A metastatic nodule to the right intercostal node is also smaller.

3. Left inguinal soft tissue suspicious for peritoneal spread of disease is also smaller.

4. No recurrence is seen at the bowel anastomic site.

  1. Interval increase in the number and size of liver hypodense lesions.

2. New hypodense lesions in segment 8/6, segment 4a/8, and segment 6/7.

3. Small left inguinal hernia with stable enhancing peritoneal thickening, suspicious for peritoneal metastasis.

4. No enhancing mass at the bowel anastomosis to suggest local recurrence.

Since surgery and the first round of chemotherapy did not cure P2, the doctor suggested more chemotherapy! Starting in August 2015,  P2 received another 3 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin + oral Xeloda.  Unfortunately, these treatment was not effective. The CEA started to climb higher, from 10.7 in July to 87.0 in October 2015.

The doctor decided to change to another chemo regime. This time, P2 received Irinotecan + oral Xeloda. The doctor was not sure how many cycle P2 had to undergo with this regimen.

P2 said after the chemo:

  • The first week, he had no appetite and was tired.
  • The second week. he regained 50 percent of his wellbeing.
  • The third week, overall regained 80 to 90 percent of his health.

Since P2 showed during his consultation with us that he was still going to chemotherapy, we suggested that he goes home first and do not take any of our herbs.

Later, we received this e-mail from P2.

In your book you mentioned that those undergoing chemo can take capsule A and B to reduce the side effects.
Can I do that now ? I am more tired and the nausea lasted longer than before

Reply: If you want to continue taking the chemo — go ahead and complete your chemo first. When they cannot do anything else for you, then come and see me again. No use trying to make your own combination of treatment. Either you follow your doctor or you follow me.

Case 3: Surgery, chemo, radiation – the cancer spread to his lung 

In May 2014, I received an email below:

Dear Dr Teo,

Thank you very much for your kindness in helping the cancer patients.

My colleague (57 years old) had just underwent rectal tumour operation and he is very worried that he might have to go for chemotherapy or radiotherapy. For your information he is diagnosed with rectal cancer stage II. We would like to go to Penang to get consult you.

We met P3 and prescribed him with herbs. We also told him to take care of his diet, change his high-pressured-lifestyle and take it easy. During our meeting, P3 also told us that he was going to undergo dendritic cell therapy to be administered with a doctor whom he knows. The treatment originated from Japan and the whole treatment would cost something like RM 65,000.  Although I did not object to what he wanted to do, I told him about another patient who had similar treatment. He had lung cancer. Started the dendritic cell therapy in Singapore – it was a failure. He then flew to Japan and continued with more dendritic cell therapy. He died.

P3 apparently took our herbs and took care of his diet. Initially we saw P5 two or three times but after that he “disappeared from our radar.”

Later, we received this email.
Dear Prof. Dr. Chris Teo,

My blood test result is bad and is increasing daily

  • 19 May 2014 before undergoing dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 1.4.

I started consuming herbal medicine given by CA Care.

  • 4 July 2014 after completion of 6 X 4 jab (24 jabs) of dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 11.3
  • 9 July 2014 go for second opinion CEA was even higher 13.4 

This is very worrying and I am very concerned about metastatic spread. Please help.  How to stop the CEA to increase soonest.

I’ve just done my colonoscopy again this afternoon and the surgeon told me that the intestine is joining up well at my rectum and tomorrow morning at 11 am he is going to do the surgery by rejoining the intestine to my stomach and seal the hole. Expected to be admitted for a week. Best Regards.

P3 was again out of our radar, not until November 2015.  This is the email.

Dear Dr Teo,

It has been 15 months that since we last wrote to you.  How are you Dr Teo?  I wish that you are always in good health.  I still read your stories, write-up on your web-site.  Your kindness in helping the patients is greatly appreciated.

Patient  has been doing chemotherapy since August 2014 and has been monitored by the doctor closely.  However, recently he was informed by the doctor that the cancer cell had spread from the rectum (stage 4) to right lung.

We do not know what to do now as we think that he has been in the good hand all this while. Dr Teo,  please let us have your advice. Thank you very much.  

 Note: Chemotherapy since August 2014:

  • From 5-August 2014, chemo drugs used: oxaliplatin + 5FU + Avastin.
  • 13-10-2014, done IMRT (Intensity-modulated radiation therapy) for 6 weeks.
  • After IMRT, continued with chemo — Avastin, 5FU. Still ongoing.
  • 28-9-2015, had needle radiotherapy (radiofrequency ablation) because of 2 tiny spots on the right lung.
  • 19-10-2015, oxaliplatin was introduced again and 5 FU still on.

Since August 2014 the CEA was always higher than normal range and CEA dropped to within normal range in May 2015.  But for the past two months, the CEA was going up again.  His recent CEA was 14.7. 

Awaiting your comment please.

Case 4: Surgery and Xeloda did not stop this colon cancer from recurring

As we were dealing with many cases of colon cancer, a friend (P4) dropped by our centre. He is 70 years old and was diagnosed with rectosigmoid cancer in October 2014.

Chee LSeng Colon

P4 underwent a surgery and the histopathology report indicated a Duke Stage B cancer with no spread to the nodes or other parts of the body. After the discharge from the hospital, P3 was given oral chemo-drug, Xeloda which he took faithfully.

Barely a year later, October 2015, the cancer recurred. P4 underwent another surgery. The histopathology report confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, recurrent in the abdominal wall.

Now, what is P4 going to do now? He had two options: Go back to his doctor and undergo chemotherapy. Or, he come to us and opt for non-medical management of his cancer. P3 decided not to undergo further chemotherapy.

Let me ask you to reflect on these two quotations:

Insanity both

7 Repeating-error-over-and-ov

Let me end by sharing with you one case which fortunately seldom happen at CA Care — a patient who does not want to share his story.

P5 is a man in his early 50s. He flew in from Singapore to seek advice about his colon cancer. As he sat down to talk, he requested that this consultation should not be video-taped. I assured him that there is no need to worry — we would not stop our video-tapping but we would not use “his” video conversation with us.

I casually asked him: How do you come to know about us?

His answer: I went into your website and read the articles your wrote. I also watched the videos you put up in the You Tube!

My response: Oh you know about us because other patients would not mind sharing their stories, and I wrote their stories and used their videos in the website. But when it comes to your turn, you would not want to allow others to know about you!

P5 started to tell his story. Basically, he had problems of his bowel movements which he ignored for some time.  When things got worse, he decided to go to the hospital for help. Colonoscopy showed a big tumour in his colon. The doctor wanted him to undergo radiotherapy and chemotherapy first. These have to be done with the hope of shrinking the tumour first before proceeding with surgery.

P5 was not happy with the doctor’s suggestion. He would not want to go for chemotherapy or surgery. After learning about us, he decided to fly all the way from Singapore to see us. He was hoping to take our herbs and the tumour will go away. My answer to him: That is wishful thinking and “madness.” I have no such magic bullet. Go home and see your doctor. Let him remove the tumour first. After your surgery, you can come back again if you think I can help you.

Before leaving, P5 asked, How much do I have to pay for this consultation? I responded:  Pay nothing!

Having documented these cases, we have two other colon cancer stories to share with you. These two patients are unique in their own ways. And they are the kind of patients who made our day! Watch out for them:

  1. Conversation with a 34-year-old with colon cancer.
  2. Conversation with a 82-year old with colon cancer.
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