2.3 cm Malignant Breast Lump: Surgery, Chemo and Radiation — Disaster

This is a tragic story which I find it real hard to “understand.” WF is 32 years old. In early 2014, WF felt a lump in her left breast. At that time she was pregnant and was about to deliver her baby. So nothing was done until after the birth of her baby.

On 14 March 2014, WF had an ultrasound of her breasts. “There is a 17 mm x 9.6 mm lesion at 2 o’clock position of left breast, 4 cm from the nipple.” A FNAC (Fine needle aspiration cytology) done in a Taiping private hospital showed “benign breast lesion.”

WF did another FNAC in April 2014. This time it was done in a private hospital in Penang. Unfortunately, the result showed “atypical cells … Highly suspicious of an infiltrating duct carcinoma.”

A trucut biopsy was done on 12 April 2014 confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma.

WF consulted another doctor in another private hospital.

25 April 2014Ultrasound of Both Breasts Irregular hypoechoic lesion between 1-2 o’clock. It measures 23 x 18 x 12 mm. Some microcalcifications seen. In keeping with a neoplasic lesion.

Based on the above, WF had surgery. A wide local excision of the left breast mass was done (lumpectomy). The tumour removed was 23 mm in size. Two of the axillary lymph nodes were involved. All resection margins were free of malignancy. Immunohistochemical study indicated a triple negative tumour: ER negative, PR negative and c-erb-B2 negative. It was a Stage 2B cancer.

9 May 2014Ultrasound of Thyroid Multiple tiny nodules seen on both thyroid lobes, likely benign.

WF subsequently had 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Neither she nor her husband knew what drugs were used. Anyway, each cycle cost RM 6,000. WF lost her hair, felt tired and nauseous during her treatment. Chemotherapy was completed by October 2014. Then WF received 20 sessions of radiation and this was completed in November 2014.

About a month later, in late December 2014, the cancer spread to WF’s brain. There were 3 lesions in her brain. WF received 2 sessions of radiation to her head in January 2015.

Two months later, March 2015, CT scan showed the cancer had spread to her lungs, bone and liver.

WF was again asked to undergo 4 cycles of chemotherapy. WF did one cycle after which she and her husband came to see us and decided not to proceed with the treatment.

Chris: Did you ever ask the doctor if surgery, chemo and radiation were going to cure your cancer?

Husband: The doctors said there is a  80 percent chance of cure?

Chris: Did you ever ask what happen to the remaining 20 percent?

No reply.

Study the numbers of her blood tests.

Date CEA CA 15.3 (normal 0-32)
5 June 2014 Less 0.5 12.3
18 Nov 2014 0.4 9.7
10 Feb 2015 Less 0.5 13.2
10 March 2015 n/a 20.3
24 March 2015 n/a 37.0
7 April 2015 n/a 96.1
22 April 2015 1.4 142.6

In March 2015, WF was started on chemotherapy again because her CA 15.3 started to rise, indicating that the earlier chemotherapy had failed. Therefore, the answer is more and more chemo?

The following are results of her CT scan and MRI.

  1. Before chemotherapy
9 May 2014CT scan of Brain, Neck, Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis Recent wide local excision of left breast carcinoma and left axillary clearance.Brain: There is no shift in the midline structures of the brain. No mass or abnormal enhancement. No extracerebral fluid collection.Lymph nodes: There are no enlarged supraclavicular, axillary, internal mammary, mediastinal or pulmonary hilar nodes.Lung: There is no pulmonary nodule or other significant pulmnary abnormality.

Liver:  Liver parenchymal density is normal. Two small hypodense lesions in segment 8, both measuring 4 mm and another two hypodense lesion in segment 7, both measuring 3 mm. Likely represent small cysts.

Bone: no significant lytic or sclerotic bone lesion seen.

 

  1. After chemotherapy
9 January 2015MRI of brain Bilateral cerebral metastases.Left frontal cortex – 21 x 16 x 15 mm well defined multilobulated massLeft basal ganglia – 9 x 8 x 9 mm.Occipitotemporal cortex – 8 x 8 6 mm.

Lesions also associated with perilesional oedema.

10 January 2015CT scan Neck, Thorax and Pelvis There is no evidence of local recurrence.Interval development of a few small lung nodules within the right lower and left upper and lower lobes. They are too small to characterise but may represent secondary deposits.Apical region of left upper lobe – 3 mm noduleRight lower lobe – 3 mm nodule

Basal segment of left lower lobe – 4 mm nodule.

10 February 2015MRI of brain Partial regression of bilateral cerebral metastases.Left frontal cortical lesion – 11 x 8 x 10 mmLeft basal ganglia – 7 x 6 x 5 mmRight occipitotemporal cortex – 6 x 5 x 4 mm

There is no associated perilesional oedema.

No new nodule seen.

24 February 2015MRI of brain Cerebral metastases increased in size.Left frontal cortical lesion – 17 x 11 x 15 mmLeft basal ganglia – 8 mmRight occipitotemporal cortex – 9 mm

Perilesional oedema has also increased.

24 March 2015MRI of brain Cerebral metastases minimally increased in size. Reduced perilesional oedema. There are likely post radiation changes.Left frontal cortical lesion – 16 x 13 x 16 mmLeft basal ganglia – 8.3 x 8.0 mmRight occipitotemporal cortex – 9 x 9 mm
7 April 2015CT scan Neck, Thorax and Pelvis Increased size of pulmonary metastases. Interval development of hepatic and skeletal metastases. And mild retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy.Lung: Apical region of left upper lobe – 4 mm nodule with central cavitation.Right lower lobe – 4 – 5 mm noduleBasal segment of left lower lobe – 4 – 5 mm nodule.

Liver:  Numerous small hypodense lesions inn both lobes of liver. Larger lesions measuring up to 15 mm.

Lymph nodes: Multiple mildly enlarge para-aortic lymph nodes – measuring up to 12 mm. Smaller lymph nodes are present along the aortocaval space.

Bone: There is an irregular poorly defined lesion in the manubrium sterni eroding the bony cortex. There is also suggestion of similar lesions in the lower cervical spine.

We need to acknowledge that the oncologist did a “good” job of taking the base line of WF’s health before chemo and radiation were started. Yes, before the treatments, WF’s brain, lymph nodes, lung, liver and bone were all clear! Meaning at that point in time, her cancer did not spread anywhere! So the doctor confidently told WF and her husband that there was a 80 chance of cure!

Then chemotherapy and radiotherapy were started.

Barely a month after treatments were completed, problems started to show up.

First, the brain. There were 3 metastatic spots in the brain. There was no such tumour before right?

Radiation was given to the brain.  The tumours shrunk a bit —  by just a bit — and then started to grow again.

By end of March 2015,  WF’s CEA started to increase telling us that chemotherapy / radiation had failed.

Then, more chemo was suggested. WF had one cycle of this second-round chemo.

In April 2015, CT showed the cancer had spread to her lung, liver, lymph nodes and bone, besides the brain.

1-Mouth-sores

Sores causing difficulties to eat

2 Compo-Brain-Lng

Brain and lung

3 Compo-Liver

Liver

Ask these questions.

  1. April 2014 she was diagnosed with a 2 cm malignant breast lump. A year later, April 2015, the cancer had spread to her brain, lung, liver, lymph nodes and bone. She did surgery, chemo and radiotherapy as dictated by the doctors. How could this be? Why do the treatments when the cancer cannot be contained or cured?
  2. Dare you ask, what if WF were to do nothing? Just leave the lump as it is. Would she end up the way she is now – with more cancer all over in the body?
  3. Is WF’s case unique or exceptional? There are many more tragic stories like this. Here is another example, click this link: Does chemotherapy make sense?
  4. When asked if the treatment would cure her cancer, WF was told, There is a 80 chance of cure. Do you believe this prognosis? Listen to another story: Breast Cancer: Do this chemo – 100 percent cure! You believe that?
  5. In WF’s case, what made the cancer so aggressive? Do you dare ask this question? Read this: Chemotherapy SPREADS and MAKES cancer more AGGRESSIVE,

Is The Present Day Cancer Treatment Based on Faulty and Inadequate Science?

  1. Some people may wish to say this is a triple negative cancer. So it is an aggressive type! Some people may say it is just your luck! My response: Many patients live a healthy life by making a CORRECT choice! It is your life.

Paula Black was given 3 to 6 months to live after being diagnosed with breast cancer. She declined chemotherapy!  Read more https://cancercaremalaysia.com/2015/01/15/advanced-breast-cancer-part-1-you-need-not-have-to-die/ and https://cancercaremalaysia.com/2015/01/19/advanced-breast-cancer-part-2-to-die-or-to-heal-is-your-choice/

Jane had a 1.2 cm lump in her right breast. Like WF above, she did a lumpectomy. Her tumour was a double negative type — negative for ER, negative PR but strongly positive for c-erbB-2. P53 was strongly over-expressed.

Jane was told to undergo chemotherapy. The package of chemotherapy + Herceptin would cost RM 120,000 while radiotherapy cost an additional RM 35,000. Jane was told that the benefit of chemotherapy and radiotherapy would be 16 percent – i.e. 16 out of 100 women are alive and without cancer because of the combined therapy.

To Jane the benefits of chemo and radiation did not make sense. She promptly refused further medical treatments and came to seek our help on 10 January 2010.

Jane told us that she refused chemotherapy because she did not want to lose her hair. In addition, her mother-in-law had lymphoma and died after two cycles of chemotherapy.

It is now 2015 (five years plus),  Jane is still doing fine. Yes, your life is in your hands – to stay healthy or to die is your choice! More about Jane: https://cancercaremalaysia.com/2013/06/10/breast-cancer-does-chemotherapy-and-radiotherapy-make-sense/

 

 

 

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Someone wrote: The Oncologist Had Prostate-Bone-Liver Cancer. And He Died

After posting the article, Malaysia’s Well Known Oncologist Died of Cancer, some readers wrote to ask what cancer he had and what he did that he died. Unfortunately, I was unable to answer these two important questions. Then out of the blue, someone wrote to fill in the gap. So here it is – the e-mail (reproduced with the kind permission of the writer).

Another question left unanswered. What medical treatments did he receive and he died because of his cancer or his treatment?  We can never know, one day we may get an e-mail from another angel ?

1st April 2013:  Dear Dr Chris Teo,

I am writing this in response to your post (16 March 2013).

It was indeed a shock for me to read in The Star news that Dr Albert Lim Kok Hooi passed away from cancer at age sixty.

Many questions ran through my mind.

  • What cancer did he die from?
  • When did he find out that he had cancer?
  • How did he treat his own cancer?
  • Why did he discover his cancer at such a late stage? 

I surfed the Internet to try to find more details. When I could not find any information, I contacted friends who knew him and his family.

I was informed that Dr Albert Lim had prostate cancer which spread to the bone and liver. Apparently his cancer was diagnosed a year ago. However he kept it from the public. No one in the hospital was allowed talk about it.

If The Star did not publish the cause of his death, we would not have known that Dr Albert Lim passed away from cancer.

Recently, I came across an online article and confirmed that Dr Albert Lim learnt he had cancer a year ago. http://thestar.com.my/health/story.asp?file=/2013/3/17/health/12844733&sec=health

To quote from the article

He also kept his cancer a secret from acquaintances and friends.

He was a private person in many ways. His cancer was something to be dealt with within the family

Now this brings up some interesting issues.

Why did Dr Albert Lim choose to keep his disease a secret?

As a prolific writer in the papers, he shared his knowledge, medical training and experience to raise the level of public awareness on how to prevent cancer, treat cancer and how to cope with cancer.

Was he doing a social service or was he merely writing to boost his image after his six months suspension from the Malaysian Medical Council?

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2007/2/23/nation/16951173&sec=nation

What had he hoped to achieve by keeping his cancer a secret?

Normally it is the patient’s prerogative whether to keep the disease secret or make it public. However Dr Albert Lim is no ordinary patient. He is a leading oncologist and a respectable authority on cancer locally and internationally. He was actively running a thriving oncology practice. He had cancer patients who made decisions based on trust and confidence in his prescriptions. Had he disclosed his condition, would some of the patients choose different courses of treatment?

It would seem that there is some implied moral duty or fiduciary duty to disclose his cancer as he is an involved party. Steve Jobs was chided for trying to conceal his pancreatic cancer from the Apple Board and investors. Under stock exchange rules, it was material disclosure as the information would have caused some investors to make their decisions differently.

Here, how do you think his patients would feel? Having faith in a doctor and having spent thousands of ringgit on chemo and other treatments, he read in the newspapers that his oncologist passed away from cancer! And the patient had no inkling that his oncologist had cancer!

It would not be unreasonable to conclude that Dr Albert Lim kept his cancer a secret as it is sheer bad publicity for the medical industry. If the Physician Heal Thyself  maxim, does not work, what faith can the patient have in the doctor? Was Dr Albert Lim worried that his business would be affected?

I am not saying that doctors are not human and that they are immune from diseases. Of course an oncologist can also be afflicted by cancer like anyone else. However, when an oncologist dispenses How To advice, we would expect that the probability of him diagnosing himself at an early treatable stage is higher than anyone else. And if he did get cancer, share the journey with others so as to benefit all.

I read a New Straits Time article dated 26 November 2012 that Dr Albert Lim gave media statements endorsing a new chemo drug which offered hope for late stage prostate cancer patients.

http://www.nst.com.my/latest/hope-for-prostate-cancer-patients-1.176963

It would now seem ironical that four months later, Dr Albert Lim died from prostate cancer. At the launch of the new drug, he knew that he was suffering from late stage prostate cancer. Unless he had tested it himself and it worked, it would seem so inappropriate to endorse a highly toxic drug. Chemo drugs are very expensive. It is unfair to sell hope to poor patients, while not proving its efficacy on oneself. Would the drug company have asked him to endorse the launch of the drug had they known the facts?

I got to know Dr Albert Lim nineteen years ago. He was Head Oncologist at KLGH. He treated my father for terminal lung cancer for six months. During that time I got to know him fairly well on a social basis.

Well, when one meets with an oncologist in a social setting and he is not wearing his professional mask, one gets some interesting insight into the medical industry.

Perhaps in those days, chemo drugs were not as advanced as today.

In the course of conversations, I found that oncologists viewed cancer patients, especially late staged ones as quite hopeless cases. The majority of cancer patients who came to seek treatment would die anyway. Whatever the oncologists do will not make much of a difference. It is a matter of time but the cancer will spread. However since patients came with hope and expect the oncologist to do something, he has to administer the prescribed industry treatment protocols whether he believed in them or not, whether he would practice the same treatment on himself or not!

Maybe the chemo drugs today are more powerful in combating cancer and Dr Albert Lim has changed his views after starting private practice. I do not know. After my father passed away I did not keep in touch. I hear of him on and off from some patients and through reading his articles.

Over the years, I had two close friends and my step mother who succumbed to cancer. They had their share of stories when dealing with oncologists.

Dr Albert Lim and most other oncologists are averse to alternative therapies, labeling anything that is not from Western medicine as quackery. I am not denying that there are some cases where cancer patients have benefitted from oncology treatment. My aunt now in her eighties survived breast cancer for forty years. She could only afford minimal cancer treatments from the hospital and nothing else. Another friend now in his fifties has against all odds battled cancer over twenty years with chemotherapy, stem cell replacement, consuming birds nest daily and mainly a strong willed mind.

However in many other cancer cases, the treatments prescribed by the oncologists did more harm than good. Unfortunately many specialists in private practice run their clinics like running a business. They have high overheads and of course, there is always the thrill of making money like any other business. In private practice, everything revolves around money.

I strongly believe in the mind-body model, the intelligence of the body to heal itself and that diet and herbs are Nature’s gifts to mankind. I do not know you but I have been following your work on and off since the publication of your first book.

At that time, my old classmate and dear friend, suffered from Stage 3 NPC. She went to a famous oncologist and was prescribed a course of radiotherapy. At the end of the sessions, he asked her to say AHHH… looked at her tongue and throat and declared her free from cancer. No other tests were done. I asked her to go to your clinic as additional treatment but she refused.

She was jubilant and went round testifying in the churches that God healed her. Six months later, the cancer came back with a vengeance. She sought treatment from a UH oncologist who gave her chemotherapy but it was too late. I saw her two weeks before she died. She held my hand and said the saddest words I ever heard “I was a fool to believe Dr T ” (the first oncologist who declared her cured). Faith is invaluable but we must be realistic.

Last year, my close friend who is a well known corporate figure, died from Stage 4 stomach cancer which spread to bones, pancreas and abdomen. Initially he was given six months to live. He was treated by the best oncologists in Singapore and locally as his company paid the medical bills. After the first six months of chemo treatment and breathing meditation which we encouraged him to learn, the PET scan showed that the cancer had disappeared. The Singapore oncologist said to him, ‘Whatever you are doing, continue with it’!

At that time, I asked him to go to your clinic to get additionally therapy. However he refused saying that he would follow the doctor’s advice. He too was jubilant and immersed himself fully in his hectic work and had no time for his breathing and meditation. Six months later, the cancer came back. He spent the next twelve months with massive chemo treatments, switching from one drug to another when the cocktail did not work. It was sad to see his health and body getting worse with each treatment. He passed away 2 ½ years after he was diagnosed. The company spent nearly RM2 million for the treatments. How many patients can afford to pay such massive sums for cancer treatment?

When friends tell me so-and-so is diagnosed with cancer, I always recommend that they explore your alternative therapy with an open mind. It is up to each to follow his inner guide as to what treatment they should sought. Living and dying are not in our hands. We do what we can to help by telling patients that there are alternatives besides chemotherapy.

I hope this fills up the gap in your blog as to how Dr Albert Lim died.

When I read Dr Albert Lim’s obituary, I wondered how he felt the instant he was diagnosed. It would have been truly useful if Dr Lim had documented his own journey. That would have been ultimate service to humanity.

Did Dr Albert Lim administer the same toxic treatments he recommended to others for himself? Do chemotherapy and other oncology therapies work? Well, it would seem not but we shall never know.  It is very easy to preach but not easy to walk in the patient’s shoes. Anyway, may the good he has done live on.

In closing, since we did not get to hear Dr Albert Lim’s experience, it may be interesting to read how other oncologists wrote about their own cancer journey.

http://www.npr.org/2010/12/14/131760656/a-breast-oncologist-diagnosed-with-the-disease

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/24/health/policy/24docs.html?pagewanted=all&_r=2&

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/02/diagnosis-stomach-cancer-profoundly-oncologist.html

The following article had gone viral but it is a very touching account from Dr Richard Teo (not an oncologist but a plastic surgeon) from Singapore who documented his cancer experience before he passed on. Irrespective of one’s religious beliefs it will be worthwhile to read with an open mind.

http://www.heavenaddress.com/Dr-Richard-Teo-Keng-Siang/424153/379719/content

Wishing you all the best always.

Yim,

Petaling Jaya

My Comment:

Thanks dear writer for giving us your precious time to share your thoughts. You have done your part! Let me conclude with these quotations:

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Comment added: 23 May 2013

“Another question left unanswered. What medical treatments did he receive and he died because of his cancer or his treatment? ”

I have some further information.

Last week, I met a family friend of Dr Albert Lim. She informed me that she only got to know Dr Lim had cancer two months before he passed away.

I asked if Dr Lim administered any treatment on himself. She said that when he was diagnosed with Stage 4 prostate cancer, he started chemotherapy. However after a few treatments, the cancer got worse and he opted to end the chemo treatment. He preferred to let the cancer advance faster. He knew there was nothing more he could do.

I asked why Dr Lim could not diagnose his own cancer earlier. Apparently, he did not have any symptoms and the cancer markers did not pick up the prostrate cancer. His oncologist friend from Europe who visited him while he was ill, commented that he too, has come across a few cases in Europe where the prostate cancer did not show up in cancer markers.

I heard from one of Dr Lim’s patients that Dr Lim was administering chemotherapy to the patient up to a week before he died. She noticed that he looked very tired and old, but he was very very nice to the patient. Of course it came as a shock to the patient to read that her oncologist died of cancer as no one knew that he was suffering from the disease.

The purpose of my writing is not to run down the Doctor or the treatments. What I learnt from this whole episode is.

1) Cancer is not always detectable at an early stage.

2) When diagnosed with cancer, a patient should educate himself on all options of treatment available and make an informed decision himself.

It is not prudent to rely on medical opinion alone.

All doctors are trained and sponsored in some way by Big Pharma. At the end of the day, they will push drugs which may not yield the desired results but because it is standard protocol, they have to recommend the regime to the patient.

The patient end up spending  and suffering unnecessarily.

Over the last four years when I accompanied my step mum for her cancer treatments at UH, I came across patients who spent all their money at private hospitals. With no money left, they came to UH to seek subsidised  treatments. It was so pitiful to talk to them, some mortgaged or sold their homes, some borrowed money and others took loans to find the elusive care.

I hope the day will come when there will be oncologists with conscience, oncologists who will honestly tell patients when all hope is gone, to stop wasting their money and find some other means of natural treatment and palliative care.

Kind regards.

Yim, Petaling Jaya

 

Healing of Metastatic Liver Cancer

Kelantan is situated in the east coast of northern Peninsular Malaysia. I know this place as a poor and backward state. But this is where I was born and brought up.  Though the people there speak Malay, the Kelantanese lingo is often not understood by people of other states in Malaysia. And the Kelantanese are proud of their lingo. This lingo is like a thread that binds the Kelantanese together – irrespective of whether you are Malays or Chinese. In this video, you will hear how we talk.

On 27 August 2010, Mat (not real name, H382), 62-year-old man from Kota Bharu, Kelantan; came to see me. He and his son walked into our centre without any medical report. I told them this is not the way we do things. I am not a village medicine man who dishes out herbs without knowing what is actually wrong with the patient. I need to read the medical reports, blood test results and see the X-rays or CT scan.  So, I told him: I am blind.

It was not possible for me to send him home empty-handed. He had travelled a whole day by bus to come here. So, I had to do what I could to help him – blind or not.

Mat said he had a cancerous lump in his right neck many years ago. This had since been removed by surgery. He was okay.  But for the past seven years he had liver problems (?). I did not know what that meant. Anyway he had consulted a specialist of a private medical centre in Kota Bharu before he came to CA Care. He was told there was something in his liver. His son said, he saw the CT scan with a “big hole” in the liver. Mat pointed out to me that his abdomen was hard.  The doctor wanted to give him chemo. He refused. His son learned about CA Care from the internet and decided to bring his father to Penang and seek another way of treating his father’s liver.  He also told the doctor that he wanted to come and see us. The doctor agreed and said there is nothing else he could offer him except chemo. Since Mat did not want the chemo, then he should go to Penang instead.

At his first visit, Mat presented with poor health. He was unable to sleep, had no appetite, bowel movements were difficult, was breathless after walking a short distance, and his abdomen was hard. He lacked energy and was always tired – sleeping most time of the day.  Based on these presentations, I suspected that he might have liver cancer – a hepatoma? Mat was prescribed Capsule A + B, LL-tea, Liver 1 and Liver 2 teas.

Honestly, I did not expect to see him again! That is the way it is with many people. They come with their problems. Unload their stories unto us. Take the herbs for about a week or two and never ever return.  They think we are magicians dishing out instant cures! I have made a study. Only 30% of those who come are serious enough wanting to find healing for themselves. The remaining 70% are just shopping for instant cures.
To our surprise Mat came back to see us again on 5 November 2010 – some three months later. He appeared happy and satisfied. And more important, he had regained his health.

Watch this video. The subtitles will help you follow our conversation.

Mat said he had regained his energy –  not tired as before. He could go fishing with his son riding the motorbike, something he could not do before. His appetite was great – he could not stop eating. And he ate a lot. Three meals a day and wanted more but his son stopped him from eating too much. He was able to sleep well. His urine flow was good – strong stream unlike before. His bowel movements were also good. His hardened abdomen had gone softer.

This is an amazing healing story, beyond our expectation.  My conversation with Mat that night was hard hitting. But I said it all with the “gentleness” of the Kelantanese lingo. So we all took it in good spirit. Mat got my points  very clearly and he appreciated them, with no offence.

Mat said: “I am sorry. It is my mistake. I was complacent. I felt so healthy that I forgot to come and see you after I finished the herbs. Boss, it was my mistake. I know that Boss is going to get angry with me. But all the same, I decided to come back again for more herbs. ”

“ I know why Boss is angry with me. This is because Boss wants his patients to get well. He wants to save their lives. So it is right if he is angry when we don’t follow what he says.”

My response to Mat that night were hard.

“That is normal. When they are dying, patients will follow what I said. But when they become well, they will immediately forget my advice.”

“What is this – you took herbs for a month but you stretched them until three months before you come back again. What are you trying to do? You know, cases like yours could be serious. You can die anytime soon. By right if you get well you should continue taking the herbs without stopping.”

“Anyway, it is your life. You are responsible for it. It is up to you, you want to die or you want to live. It is your choice and your responsibility.”

“Your healing is most unexpected. I don’t expect you to get well so soon. But you did. Consider this as a blessing from God. It is a real gift from God. Appreciate it or you throw it down the drain. It will be a waste if you throw it away. Know that this is indeed a blessing. ”

“Remember, to remain healthy or to get sick is your choice and your responsibility. I have shown you the way. You have already experienced the healing. Now, it is up to you take the road and proceed further. Nobody can walk this road for you.”

To those patients reading this case study, I would say the same thing to you. Just one reminder, please bring all your medical records when you come!

Let me conclude by saying this: “All said, I like Mat – this man from Kelantan. I am glad that I was able to help him!”

5 December 2010: Mat came back to see us again – exactly a month after his second visit. My earlier message (“scolding”) got across to him. Wonderful! On top of it he brought along his medical reports.

Medical History: He had painless, neck swelling since 2000. CT scan of head and neck on 28 August 2003 indicated an enlarged “right submandibular gland. It measures 2.3 x 2.7 x 4.2 cm. Right maxillary sinus mucocele and concurrent chronic siniusitis.”

Surgery was performed to remove the lump. Histopathology report confirmed “adenoid cystic carcinoma. Tumour extends to the outer capsule of salivary gland.”

Ultrasonography of the liver on 4 December 2010 (a day before his present visit) indicated “liver is enlarged (21 x 11 cm) and irregular. Heterogeneous parenchymal echo texture with many nodular masses with varying sizes and texture with irregular outlines. A big nodule  10 x 8 cm in size in the inferior part of the right lobe crossing segmental boundaries showing necrotic centre. Ascitic fluid is present. Impresion: multiple metastatic lesions of the liver.

My first question to Mat was: “How are you doing?” Without hesitation he replied that he was good and well. During this visit he was accompanied by his son and daughter. Four points were highlighted.

  • The son pointed out that before taking the herbs, Mat’s abdomen was enlarged. Now, the swelling had subsided significantly although the abdomen is still hard.
  • Mat has more strength. He said he is strong for a man of his age – 62 years old.
  • Mat is able to go fishing, unlike before.
  • His pale palms are now pink. His face is flushed. He looks and feels healthy.
  • One problem Mat is facing now is his ferocious appetite. Mat said: “ I just liked to eat.” His daughter said: “Every time he wakes up he wants to eat.” I told Mat: “Most cancer patients have poor appetite. In your case you always want to eat. I don’t have herbs to stop your appetite!”

Mat promised to come back again. In the meantime he will stick on with the good diet and herbs.

Comments: According to the oncology books; Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine 15th Ed., pg.589: “If untreated, most patients die within 3 to 6 months of diagnosis.”  Martin Abeloff, et al.  in Clinical Oncology, Vol: 2, pg. 1697 said: “Median survival of Hong Kong patients with inoperable HCC – tumour larger than 6 cm in diameter and receiving no treatment – was 3.5 weeks.  Tumour doubling time ranged from 1 to 19.5 months, with an average of 6.5 months.”

More related stories:

Liver Cancer: Surgery and Chemo Did Not Cure Him

A Great Failure and Let Down

Surgery for Liver Cancer: Eighty Percent Success?

Liver Cancer: He Died After a RM 10,000 Open-Close Surgery

The Doctor Said: “No More Hope” After a 60-Million-Rupiah Operation for Bile Duct Cancer