Brain Cancer: Operation, Radiation, Blind After Two Weeks

rice-field

Amar (not real name) is a 32-year-old Indonesia male. In April 2016, he had a seizure and vomited. He was immediately sent to the hospital in Batam. After performing an X-ray, he was given some medication and sent home. He was able to go back work.

One week later, Amar went into a coma and was sent back to the hospital again. The doctor told the family Amar had stage 4 brain cancer. He was asked to immediately undergo a brain surgery. The doctor said that was the only option left. The risk of surgery would be: Amar could suffer memory loss or he could go blind.

The operation was carried out in Batam and Amar regained consciousness. The operation cost IDR 170 million. Unfortunately the surgeon was only able to remove 70 percent of the tumour. Amar was asked to undergo chemotherapy which the family rejected.

This is what Amar’s brain looked like after the surgery.

brain-augus-batam

Amar was brought to consult two doctors in Johor Baru. One surgeon suggested that Amar should undergo another surgery to removed more of the tumour in his brain. An oncologist suggested radiotherapy. The family opted for the latter and he had 30 sessions of radiation. Radiotherapy cost the family RM 12,000.

Two week after the completion of the radiation treatment, Amar became blind. As a follow up the oncologist put Amar on oral chemotherapy. Amar had three round of chemotherapy. Then his brother decided to come to Penang to seek our help.

 

Chris: When you were asked to undergo the operation, did you ask the surgeon if he was going to be able to cure your brother?

Brother: We did not ask. We did not know else to do.

C: Actually, surgery would not cure anything! Then you went for radiotherapy. Did you ask if this was going to cure him?

B: We asked about the benefit of radiation. The doctor said radiation cannot cure, but we need to try. We want the radiation to kill the cancer cells!

C: Then the oral chemo-drug. What good will that do to your brother? Let me be very outright with you. No one can cure your brother’s cancer. For all that you have done, your brother ended up blind. You now come and see me. What do you expect me to do?

B: I want to find a cure for my brother.

C: That is impossible. There is really nothing much I can do. You may just waste your money and efforts. So go home and discuss with the family — what they really want to do.

B: The family do not know what to do. I want to try your herbs.

What if you do nothing?

do-nothing

The son and daughter of this patient came to our centre. Yes, they felt compelled to do the utmost for their father. But sometimes, it is wiser and braver not to do a thing. In this case, it would be a bad joke to believe that 5 times radiation and a biopsy would make sense. What do you hope to achieve? To say that radiation is going to kill the cancer cells or to stop the cancer from spreading is only a good selling point, nothing than that. Let’s not be naive.

Let us recall two well documented brain cancer cases in the US. Let’s see if we can learn anything from these.

  1. Senator Kennedy and glioma

Senator Kennedy was diagnosed with a malignant glioma in May 2008, after being hospitalized following a seizure. A month later, he underwent what was described as “successful” surgery at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, and then received both chemotherapy and radiation after returning home to Massachusetts.

Six months after the diagnosis, Senator Kennedy had returned to the Capitol and was working part-time while still continuing with treatment. However, in January 2009, he collapsed during the inaugural luncheon for the new president Barack Obama. Senator Kennedy died in August 2009 — barely one year after his diagnosis.

Source:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/708105

  1. Beau Biden, US vice president’s son, died at 46 of brain cancer.

The son of Vice President Biden and former state attorney general of Delaware, died after battling brain cancer. In 2010, Beau Biden had suffered what officials described as a mild stroke. Three years later, 2013,  he was admitted to the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Doctors removed a small lesion from his brain and then followed a normal course of radiation and chemotherapy. By November 2013, he had been given a clean bill of health, but after a recurrence in 2015, Biden began an aggressive treatment and was admitted to Walter Reed.  He died in May 2015.

Source:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2015/05/30/e1ac5a2a-0731-11e5-a428-c984eb077d4e_story.html

The above are outstanding “sons” of America where the best of medical treatments can be found and are available. Senator Kennedy or AG Biden would have access to the best of medical technology to combat their brain cancer. Yet, they died. What chance do we — common folks — have? Or are we  being misled and sold false hope?

Read what Dr. Tobias has got to say about surgery for brain cancer ….

6-surgery-tobias-brain-ca

See our next posting: Brain Tumour – No to Surgery.

 

 

 

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Surgery and Chemotherapy Did Not Cure Their Breast Cancer: Equally A Big Mistake?

Lately, we encountered many breast cancer cases. Indeed pathetic. By sharing these stories with you, we hope that those who come after this unfortunate patients, can learn and understand that cure for cancer is rather elusive.

—————————————————————————————————————

Earlier, we posted about patients who took herbs to “cure” their breast cancer. They ended up in a deep, dark pit. It appears that we have a fool-proof scapegoat to blame. Ah, I told you so, why do such “silly” things taking those unproven and unscientific herbs! Sound familiar right?

But here are patients who did the “right thing” from the very start. They went to see their doctors, did what their doctors wanted them to do — i.e. surgery and chemotherapy. After undergoing all these treatments and having spent so much money besides enduring all the nasty side effects, they also ended up in the deep, dark pit — equally messy and equally dangerous situations like the patients who took the “unscientific” path.

Let us present you these 4 sad cases which we encountered very recently.

Case 1: Jati (not real name) is a 60-year-old Indonesian lady.  She was diagnosed with right breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. Then she underwent 12 cycles of chemotherapy and 5 sessions of radiation. She was told the cancer had already spread to her lungs. Jati took 2 cycles of Xeloda.

The cancer did not go away. Jati came to a private hospital in Penang and underwent 6 cycles of chemo. Each cycle cost her RM 4,500.

CT scan on 4 May 2016 showed:

  • The mass seen in the right axilla and right retropectoral region appears slightly larger compared with the previous scan on 24 February 2016.
  • The nodules in the right and left lungs are larger and more in number compared with the previous scan.

Blood test on 4 May 2016 showed her CA 125 was at 165 (High, normal 0-35) and GGT at 123 (High, normal 9-36).

The above results showed that the chemo was not effective. Not only that, the cancer had grown to be more serious. The oncologist asked Jati to do more chemo! And more chemo? Actually, Jati had just been hospitalised for 5 days due to severe diarrhea after the chemo.

Jati refused further chemotherapy and came to seek our help. Chemo made her skin turn dark like the pictures below:

Composite-Jati

Case 2: Shirley (not real name) is a 53-yer-old Indonesian lady. In 2012, she was diagnosed with Stage 2B, right breast cancer. She underwent a mastectomy. Histopathology confirmed an infiltrating carcinoma, mixed ductal & lobular. The tumour size: 2.4 x 2.4 x 1.5 cm.  One of 12 lymph nodes were positive for tumour cells. The tumour was negative for estrogen receptor, negative for progresterone receptor and negative for Her 2/neu.

Shirley received 6 cycles of chemotherapy. No radiation or medication was indicated since this was a triple negative cancer.

Shirley had regular checkup and everything seemed to be normal. CT scan on 17 April 2015 showed no signs of metastatic process. Upper and lower abdominal organs are within normal ecopattern. But the good news did not last. A few months later, blood test showed the CA 15.3 was rising.

PET scan on 14 August 2015, showed:

  • the cancer had spread to the lymph nodes — left collar bone and arm pit, paratracheal, etc.
  • there is fluid in the lung, probably due to metastasis.
  • there is a lesion in Segment 7 of the liver.
  • metastatic lesions in the bone — sternum and rib bone.

Composite-Shirley

Shirley was asked to undergo chemotherapy again. After 2 cycles of chemo, she was told that the treatment was not effective. Shirley then went to another hospital where she received another 3 cycles of chemo — Brexel (Docetaxel), Epirubicin and Cyclophasphamide. After that Shirley decided to give up.

The following is her blood test results — in spite of the chemo.

  CA 15.3
30 December 2015 41.99
12 February 2016 43.00
30 April 2016 114.10

Having run out of option, Shirley and her husband came to seek our help.

Case 3: Mas (not real name) is a 44-year-old Malaysian lady from Sabah. In May 2015, she felt a lump in her left breast and did not bother about it. About 7 months later, in December 2015, she went for a check-up.

Ultrasound on 4 December 2015, showed:

  • a large ill-defined hypoechoic lesion at 2:00 – 26.9 x 33.0 mm.
  • two ill-defined hypoechoic lesons at 11:00 – 5.5 x 5.4 mm and 8.9 x 8.2 mm.
  • enlarged left axillary lymph node, 1 cm.

A mammogram on 4 December 2015, showed a large ill-defined mass with spiculated margins and architectural distortion at the left upper outer quadrant, 2 o’clock.

Mas complained of pains in her backbone. A CT scan on 15 December 2015 indicated the following:

  • confirmed earlier finding of an irregular mass in the left breast, 2.0 x 3.8 x 3.8 cm in size.
  • multiple hypodense lesions of varying sizes scattered in both liver lobes in keeping with liver metastasis. The largest at segment 8, measuring 3.4 x 3.2 cm.
  • a small hypodense cystic lesion at pancreatic body measuring 0.5 x 0.3 cm, likely benign.
  • multiple lytic lesions scattered in almost entire visualised vertebrae, both iliac bones and sternum in keeping with bone metastasis.

Composite Mas Sabah

Mas underwent a mastectomy in January 2016.  The tumour was ER positive, PR positive and HER2 positive.

After surgery, in February 2016, Mas was started on chemotherapy (drugs: EC). The treatment was scheduled for 6 cycles but after 3 cycles the doctor stopped the treatment because Mas’s liver was badly affected. Mas also suffered side effects of the chemo for the entire 3 weeks after each cycle of chemo.

  1 March 2016 22 March 2016
ALP 308 H 455 H
ALT 153.3 H 96.1 H
AST 228.7 H 200.4 H

 

Case 4:  Yan (not real name) is a 36-year-old Indonesian. She felt a small lump in her breast in January 2016. The nipple discharged pus. A biopsy indicated cancer. Yan underwent a mastectomy on 26 February 2016 in a private hospital in Melaka, Malaysia. Histopathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma. Fourteen of the 16 axillary lymph nodes showed evidence of tumor metastasis. One lymph node at Level II showed evidence of metastasis.

The tumour was positive for oestrogen receptor, negative for progesterone receptor and positive for C-erbB-2.

PET scan on 23 March 2016 confirmed the cancer had spread to the numerous lymph nodes in the body.

Dwi Jandayani Yan

Yan was referred to an oncologist for follow-up. Based on the above, the oncologist recommend the following:

  1. Chemotherapy – 8 cycles, 3 weeks once. Cost: AC + Gran RM 2,500 x 4 = RM 10,00. Docetaxel + Pegasta RM 5,600 x 4 = RM 22,400. So in total the 8 cycles of chemo would cost about RM 32,400.
  2. Heceptin, total of 17 injections, to start at 5th chemo session. This could take a year at total cost of RM 150,000.
  3. Radiotherapy, 15 sessions, for three weeks. Cost RM 10,000.
  4. Hormonal therapy to take for 10 years. Nolvadix (or Tamoxifen), 20 mg, RM 150 per month.

Did you ask if the above treatments are going to cure you? I never ask! I only asked about the side effects.

What are the side effects? Total hair loss, nausea and onset of menopause.

So what do you want to do now? I don’t want to do any chemo.

A quick addition of all costs: RM 200,400 (besides the surgery).

Can we learn some lesson from all these cases?

These four patients did the “right thing” from the medical perspective. After all we have been told and made to believe that medicine is scientific and proven. Reflect on the various quotations below, then ask these question: Is the present treatment of breast cancer (or any cancer at all) based on science? Or is it just a guessing game based on biased opinions? Are you being told the truth or being misled?

Why The Current Cancer Treatment Failed

42 Whitaker Treatment-failure

26 Successs-is-an-illusion

 

37 War-on-Cancer-wrong-concept

Cancer Treatment is a Guessing Game — no one can tell why

3 Chemo attempt to kill cancer before killing patient JohnLee

Am I Not Told All These?

You are not alone. Even educated people like an army colonel also got trapped. 

30-Chemo-hell-wife-died-of-

The Cruel, Mad and Greedy World

We really felt sorry for Yan, sitting in front of us not knowing what to do.

Let’s take a closer look at her case. She was 36 years old when diagnosed with breast cancer. After surgery, the follow-up chemo treatments alone would coast her about RM 200,000. That did not take in consideration cost of travel and stay in Malaysia (on and off) for the treatment for about a year. Let’s assume that everything comes to about RM 300,000 for the treatment.

Let us also assume that she will be cured after all these treatments — which may not necessarily be the case. She may die half way through the treatment. She may suffer a relapse after spending that RM 300,000. No one can predict, no one can tell and no one can know for sure.

If there is a recurrence, there will be another pile of medical bills to settle.

If Yan were to start saving right on  the first day when she was born, it would come to about RM 694 per month or RM 8,333 per year. Do that for 36 years to be able to raise that kind of money for her “unpredictable” breast cancer treatment.

Look at it another way. If Yan were to go to the university and started work at age 20, it would mean that each year she has to save RM 18,750 per year or RM 1,562 per month for 16 years to be able to accumulate RM 300,000 to pay for her medical bills.

Indeed, something must have gone wrong in this world today? Is it not about time that someone come out with an cheap but effective option to heal cancer?  Knowing how the world operates that is another illusion! Read these quotations:

1 Medicine-greed-cant-change

3 Treatment-that-makes-money 4 Oncology-all-about-money

 

After all the staggering cost and believing that there is a cure, here’s the real bomb shell

32 Chem-spreads-cancer-Fred-Hu

Related cases:

Listen, there is NO cure for metastatic cancer!

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Radiation and Hormonal Therapy Did Not Cure Her. Xeloda made her miserable! Patient, Only You Should Decide What You Want To Do!

Breast Cancer: Surgery did not cure. Recurrence and cancer spread extensively to her lungs. But does she want to live?

Look at the Bigger Picture Part 2. You don’t have to “swallow” everything that they offer you!

2.3 cm Malignant Breast Lump: Surgery, Chemo and Radiation — Disaster

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Radiation and Tamoxifen Did Not Cure Them

 

 

 

Cancer Recurred After Liver Surgery: The same story again and again!

In the past few weeks, three liver cancer patients came to seek our help. These are their stories and we hope readers and patients can learn from their tragic experiences.

Case 1

Patient is a 66-year-old man from Singapore. He did not have any symptoms. His liver function was normal but a CT scan in September 2014, showed he had liver problems. Patient was referred to a liver specialist in a government hospital. MRI was done and on 26 February 2015, patient underwent a laparoscopic liver resection of segments 5, 6, 7 and 8 of his liver. At the same time, he also had a cholecystectomy (removal of gallbladder).

Histopathology report confirmed a hepatoceullular carcinoma (HCC).

Five months later, 14 July 2015, MRI showed new foci of the HCC seen in segments 7 and 2/3 of the liver. The cancer had recurred.

In August 2015, patient underwent a second liver surgery. This time it was a wedge resection of segments 6 and 7 of his liver. At the same time FRA (radiofrequency ablation) was performed onthe tumour in segment 2/3.

Three months later, 13 November 2015, MRI showed the cancer had come back again — “interval progression of disease with numerous bilobar foci of HCC in the remnant liver.”

Patient was told another surgery was not an option anymore. He could go for TACE (transarterial chemoembolization) or a liver transplant.

Patient and his son came to seek our opinion. We told the patient: “If you come here expecting us to cure you, then we are sorry to say that we have no magic bullet to cure you!”  Patient went home disappointed.

Case 2

Patient is a 73-year-old Malaysian. Sometime in December 2014, he had jaundice. A CT scan showed his liver was really bad.

CompositeOoi

On 29 January 2015 patient underwent surgery in a government hospital. His gallbladder was removed. Segment 3, 4B and left lateral section of his liver were also removed.

Histopathology report confirmed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with foci of angioinvasion.

Two months later, March 2015, a CT scan showed a few spots in his liver. The doctor suspected recurrence.

A CT scan on 1 December 2015, showed “innumerable arterially enhancing nodules seen in both lobes of liver. Disease in progression.”

Patient was referred to a private hospital in Penang and was offered to participate in Phase 3 Clinical Trial — Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)  versus Sorafenib.

Sorafenib (also known as Nexavar) is a so called targeted oral chemo drug. Normally it cost RM 15,000 to 20,000 per month. The SIRT (radiation) would normally cost RM 50,000.

Can the above treatments cure patients? This patient was told it would just prolong life. Prolong for how long? No one does not seem to know! Patient was also told that he “qualifies” to participate in this clinical trial, Nexavar would be provided to him for free but he was pre-warned about the following side effects of Nexavar.

Case 3

Patient is a 67-year-old Malaysian. On 16 December 2014, he had biliary sepsis (infection of the bile duct which is generally followed by obstruction of the bile duct). A biliary sphincterotomy was performed (Sphincterotomy is a complex procedure…. involves deep cannulation of the bile duct followed by severance of the sphincter of Oddi with the electrocautery).

Unfortunately, his problem persisted. On 29 January 2015, his blood test returned the following results.

Globulin 40     H
Alkaline phosphatase 135   H
ALT 46     H
GGT 363   H
AST 46     H
CA 19.9 85.17  H

A CT scan on 20 February 2015, showed an ill-defined hypodense lesion in the left lobe of the liver and para-aortic lymphadenopathy. Findings are suggestive of cholangocarcinoma (bile duct cancer) and bile duct obstruction.

Blood test on 23 February 2015 showed his condition had deteriorated.

Total bilirubin 239.8  H
Direct bilirubin 169.0  H
Indirect bilirubin 70.8    H
Alkaline phosphatase 245  H
ALT 91    H
GGT 666  H
AST 92    H
CA 19.9 85.17  H

On 23 February 2015, patient underwent another operation — a left hemihepatectomy and radical choledochectomy (removal of a portion of the common bile duct).

2

1

 

Everything seemed to work well for a while. Patient returned to his surgeon for routine check-up every 3 months. Unfortunately, 9 months later, the cancer started to recur in his liver again.

A CT scan on 7 December 2015 stated: There are “at least 9 low attenuation lesions in the right lobe of the liver, largest at anterior segment 8 measuring 4.1 x 3.8 cm. These could be due to recurrent tumour and metastases.

Patient spent RM 74,910 (covered by medical insurance) for the above failed treatment.

Like the patient of Case 2, this patient was referred to the same oncologist and was offered the following options:

  1. Sorafinib or Nexavar
  2. TACE – transaterial chemoembolization
  3. SIRT (Selective Internal Radiation Therapy).

Daughter Told About CA Care

While flying from Penang to Singapore, the patient’s daughter was seated next to an Indonesian lady who is our patient. During their casual conversation, the patient’s daughter came to know about CA Care. As a result, father and daughter came to seek our help and decided not to pursue further medical treatment.

Comment

For the treatment of HCC, Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, 15th Edition, page 589 says:

  • Surgical resection offers the only chance for cure; however, few patients have a resectable tumour at the time of presentation.
  • Randomized trials have NOT shown a survival advantage after chemoembolization.
  • The liver cannot tolerate high doses of radiation.
  • The disease is not responsive to chemotherapy.

If there is a tumour in the liver, the answer is probably “CUT it out”. But take note that cutting does not necessarily cure your cancer because in the first place it is not suitable for cutting — it could be too big in size or the cancer has already spread too extensively. But cutting seems to be the only sensible option.  And many patients, like the above cases, have gone through it. Disaster.

One important aspect of liver surgery which you should know is that, as in the above cases, the cancer can come back again 3 to 9 months after an apparently “successful surgery.”  Patient No: 2 spent RM 75,000 for the operation and 9 months later, 9 new lesions were found in his liver.

After surgery has failed, patients are offered the next “useless” line of defence — Go for TACE, i.e. chemoembolization, radiation or chemotherapy. The above medical textbook says, all these are not effective.

Reflect on these Quotations

Insanity both

5 Ssurgery come back again

 

 

 

 

 

Eighty-Two-Year-Old Colon Cancer Patient Shares His Story

This is a happy story about a 82-year-old colon cancer patient. To us, he is known as Penang Hill Uncle (PHU). This is because his hobby is hill climbing and he has been doing this everyday for the past 30 years! Even today he still goes hill climbing, never mind that he has cancer!

PHU came to see us in October 2012 after undergoing surgery for his colon cancer. He refused chemotherapy. He said. “Chemo is difficult. I prefer to try my chances with your herbs.”  After 3 years, we sat down with PHU to recall what he had gone through. And PHU said he was very happy to share his story with us.

November 2015:

Chris: Uncle, we are going to write your story. Is it okay with you? For the video, we will mask your face so that they don’t know your identity.

PHU: It is okay. No need to mask my face! I am not ashamed. I am not a thief. Let everyone know about this!

So here goes, PHU’s story.

 

Initial Problem and Hospital Experience

In July 2012, 79 year-old-PHU did a colonoscopy followed by a  CT scan. The result showed the presence of a 3.1 x 3.0 x 3.3 cm fungating mass at the sigmoid colon, in keeping with a primary tumour. There was no evidence of distant metastasis although the cancer had spread to the surrounding nodes.

The only option for PHU was surgery. But before surgery, PHU was told that the procedure could be risky. He might suffer a heart attack, stroke or may even die. However, PHU had no choice but to go under the knife. He survived without any problem! The surgery was done in August 2012 and it only cost him RM 3,000 (in a government hospital).

Two days after surgery, one of his leg became numb and was unable to move! One doctor asked him to take Hacks. The problem was resolved. He was discharged from the hospital after a week.

The histopathology report confirmed a rectosigmoid colon cancer – well-differentiated with visceral peritoneum involvement and lymph node metastases (7/12); pT4,pN2,pMx. PHU was told his cancer was Stage 3 (going to Stage 4).

No to Chemotherapy, Took His Chances with Herbs and Diet Change

PHU was asked to consider undergoing 8 cycles of chemotherapy. But the doctor did caution him about the risks involved.

PHU also was also told that the benefit of chemotherapy is only 10 percent. Without chemo, the chances of the cancer recurring and spreading is 50 percent. If PHU were to undergo chemotherapy, the chances of recurring and spreading is 40 percent.

Due to his old age and also him being without any symptom, PHU and family opted to “watch and see.” No chemotherapy! He said, ” I decided to take my chances with your herbs and therapy.” That was when PHU came to seek our help in early October 2012. He was started on the herbs for his colon and metastatic lymph nodes.

PHU went back to see his doctors at the general hospital for monitoring every few months. All was well. The doctors were also aware that PHU was on herbal therapy and they did object about this.

In September 2013, PHU had his heart checked. Look at what the doctor wrote below:

Fit-and-Healthy

The AcuGraph readings over the years showed improved energy levels.

16 Nov 12

16 November 2012

14 Nov 13

14 November 2013

18Dec15

18 December 2015

(Note: AcuGraph 4 was donated by Dr. Adrian Larsen of Miridia Technology Inc., USA. Use of AcuGraph at CA Care is free of charge)

 

The following are his blood test results over the years.

Date CEA Remark
13 Aug 2012 10.1 Before surgery
18 March 2013 3.2  
20 Nov. 2013 2.8 Started herbs & good diet, October 2013
20 Jan. 2014 4.5 Started to eat outside food
13 June 2014 2.1  
4 Aug. 2014 5.4  
26 Nov. 2014 5.6  
18 May 2015 9.1  

 

 

Sudden Rise of CEA to 9.1

After 3 years of “doing well” PHU told us that his CEA had started to increase from 2.1 to 9.1. PHU said in the first year after surgery he was very strict with his diet. So his CEA was well within normal limit, below 5.0. But as he got better and better, PHU started to eat  “outside” food. It was then that his CEA started to climb out of normal range.

Such development is not surprising at all. It happened most of the time with most patients. This reflects human nature. Since he is already 80 plus, so be it! We hope that his problem will not go out of control!
Each Day, I Never Think About My Cancer or that I Am Going to Die

Chris:  Uncle, does this cancer bother you every day? Does it worry you? Do you ever think that it is going to die because of this cancer?

PHU: No, it does not worry me. People who does not have cancer also die. So why worry so much? Also people tell me that too much worry can kill you!

Hill Climbing – My only job!

Chris: What do you do every day? Hill climbing?

PHU: Yes, Monday to Friday I go out to climb the hills. I started off about 3 pm and come home at 5.30 pm. Every day I do that. I have been doing this for the past 30 years! It has become my job!

 

 

 

Bye bye Ovarian Cyst and Bye bye Repeat Surgery

This is an e-mail, we received on 21 August 2013:

Dear Mr Chris,

I am happy to know through my friend about your nature cure herbal medicines. I would like to consult you for my wife fibroid problem at Ovarian and Uterus .

We did laparoscopy and removed the cyst last year, but still we suspect it’s growing up again. Recently we didn’t take any treatment or  medication (allopathic). The doctor(in Singapore) didn’t prescribe any medicine and advice her to take birth control pills regularly to suppress the Hormone. But she stopped taking as it shows some side effects like tiredness and general weakness.

Now she has no other symptoms except severe hair loss and her stomach looks bloated.

Reading your website I understand there is a fibroid tea for to cure the cyst , how to get the medicine. We are Indian Nationality currently residing in Singapore. Do you have any clinics in Singapore or nearby or shall we need to visit you personally?

Kindly advice us where to buy the medicine if taking medicine is enough.

Best Regards
R

Reply: Better that you come and see me personally with all the medical reports and scan …then we take it from there.

 

 

This patient was out of our “radar” for quite a while after her visit. Then on 13 November 2015, we received this e-mail:

Dr Chris,

Since that day we met, my wife taking herbs Utero-Ova and GY6. It works amazingly and recent studies on her medical report shows very good improvement and she is getting better. Thanks for your advice and consultation.

However , hearing the so many news of people suffering from Cancer, she is very much worried and She want to take some other herbs that could prevent Cancerous cells affecting her well being. Is there any? Especially for Breast Cancer and Colon Cancer (for Male /Female) , if there is,  can you prescribe that.

Waiting for your advice. Regards.

Reply:  Thank you very much for your email. I am real glad that your wife benefited from the herbs — yes, many others like her also had similar good effects. Can you share with us why you say your wife is getting better? She went to see the doctor and what did the medical report say? Health wise — how is she now compared to before taking the herbs — in what way is she better?

Regarding, cancer prevention. No, I don’t have any magic bullet for that. You need to take care of your diet, be happy and excercise always …if you like to use the e-therapy machine for health maintenance .. it may help you. For that you need to come and see me again and we discuss. Take care.

Good Morning Dr Chris,

At that time of consultation she was under English Medication and suggested surgery to remove her cyst, earlier she had lap. surgery in Singapore to remove the cyst. After sometime it grew back to around 7 cm., and the same treatment and Surgery was prescribed in Singapore and Surgery was advised  to be  repeated, whenever it grow.

After taking the Herbs for six months, the size reduced to 4cm and we continued taking for two years, last month she had the scan and the report shows only less than 5 mm cysts and nothing more … Regards.

Medical reports 

  1. 2011 – pains during menses (severe dysmenorrhea). Blood discharge with clots. Scan showed chocolate cysts in both ovaries.
  1. Prescribed painkiller and hormone pill (progesterone).
  1. More pain during every menstrual cycle.
  1. Doctor suggested operation.
  1. Patient went back to India for further management.
  1. Scan in India in June 2011, showed bilateral ovarian cysts.

Right ovary: mass about 4.7 x 8.4 cm with both solid and cystic components seen. Ovary not seen separately.

3-Right-ovary

Left ovary: mass about 8.5 x 5.2 cm with both solid and cystic components and ovary could not be visualised separately.

left-ovary

  1. MRI on 17 June 2011 showed enlarged left ovary with cystic components and suggestion of bleed displacing the uterus to the right side. Possibility of endometriosis needs to be considered. The lesion measures about 9.7 x 6.0 cm.
  1. Fluid removed from cycts. IUD placement. No medication. Waited for few months.
  1. Return to Singapore. May 2012. Laparoscopic bilateral ovarian cystectomy, adhesiolysis and hydrotubation. Diagnosis: benign endometriotic cysts.

2-Laparoscopic-surgery

  1. Unfortunately, the cyst recurred. Again 8 cm in size.
  1. Started on GY 3 and GY 6 from CA Care. Now, cyst almost gone, 5 mm. 

Comments

Ladies if you have problems with your periods, uterus and ovary, we suggest that you listen to this video careful. There are many things that you can learn from our conversation. Perhaps your doctors would not ask you such questions that we asked.

Before you rush to have your ovaries or uterus removed, please read the following:

In What Doctors Don’t Tell You, Lynne McTaggart wrote:

  • Hysterectomy outranks all others when it comes to the most unnecessary of surgical procedures.
  • Three-quarters of all hysterectomies are performed on women under 50 for highly dubious reasons.
  • In abdominal hysterectomies, side-effects can occur in more than 40 percent of operations. These side-effects include bowel problems, incontinence, risk of fatal blood clot.
  • One-third to nearly one-half of all women report a decrease in sexual response.
  • If a woman’s ovaries are removed at the same time, she will experience severe menopausal symptoms.

In The Hysterectomy Hoax, Dr. Stanley West, M.D.; wrote:

  • More than 90 percent of hysterectomies are unnecessary.
  • Only 10 percent of all hysterectomies are done for cancer. Unless you have cancer, it is unlikely that you need a hysterectomy.
  • Hysterectomy can have long-lasting physical, emotional, and sexual consequences that may undermine your health and well-being.
  • It is no secret that many women develop serious health problems after hysterectomy. Depression, fatigue, urinary disorders, joint aches and pains, and unwelcome changes in sexual desire are the most common complaints.
  • No man would agree to have his sexual and reproductive organs removed for anything short of life-threatening illness.
  • The fact that women allowed this to happen (to themselves) attest to their lack of knowledge about the consequences of hysterectomy and about the availability of alternatives to surgery.
  • I understand why doctors want to perform hysterectomies better than I understand why women agree to them.
  • Hysterectomy is a relatively easy operation. It does not require the surgical finesse need to perform … many of the other alternative procedures. Many gynecologists simply do not have the experience to do all of the other operations that can be substituted for hysterectomy when surgery is needed.
  • Gynecologists are surgeons. We make our living by performing operations. If hysterectomy is the operation a surgeon knows best, it is the one he or she will recommend and perform most often.
  • Clearly, many doctors have an economic incentive to recommending hysterectomy.
  • Your reproductive system is a beautifully crafted apparatus powered by the ebbs and flows of a variety of hormones.
  • It is time for women to recognize hysterectomy for the threat it is and to refuse to have the surgery except when their lives are at stake.

(Who is this author, Dr. Stanley West? He wrote: At this point, you must be wondering who I am and why I am opposed to hysterectomy. I am a gynecologist … chief of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at St. Vincent’s Hospital, one of New York’s most prestigious medical institutions … I have helped hundreds of women avoid hysterectomy. I didn’t set out to crusade again hysterectomy. In medical school, I believe what I was taught: that hysterectomy is good for women. Then and now, prevailing medical wisdom holds that the uterus is a disposable organ that serves no useful purpose once a woman has all the children she wants. What’s more, it is regarded as something of a nuisance.)

In Sex, Lies & the Truth About Uterine Fibroidsthe author Carla Dionne asked: Do physicians lie to their patients? Some do. Most don’t. Some aren’t aware that incomplete information is construed as a “lie” by their patients. Some simply don’t keep up-to-date on the latest medical information.

This is  our message: Ladies if you have problems with your menses – excessive bleeding, severe pain, cyst, fibroid, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, menopause, etc., know that you don’t need hormone pills or surgery! Herbs can help resolve your problems.

Read more here:

1.  Ovarian Cyst & Fibroid Gone After 3 Months on Herbs

2. My 6.9 cm Ovarian Cyst Disappeared !

3. Nur with Ovarian Cysts Refused Surgery. Conceived, Caesarean Birth, Cysts Disappeared!

4. Ovarian Cysts Unable to Conceive Took Herbs, Pregnant and Gave Birth

5. Endometriotic Cyst Disappeared After Three Months on Herbs

6. Hot Flashes Gone After Three Months on Menopause Pills

7. Menstrual Pain and Bleeding Resolved After Herbs

 

 

 

 

Colon Cancer: When Medical Treatments Did Not Cure Them

The past few weeks, many patients came to us with problem of colon-rectal cancer. Let us share with you some of the cases. We hope the experiences of these patients could provide us some lessons. Perhaps we don’t have to travel the same road that they took!

Case 1: Stage 4 Colon Cancer – surgery and chemo. Kidney problem and told to go for more chemo?

Dear Dr Teo,

My name is SL, aged 50 this year and I am from Singapore. I am writing to you in hope that you can provide me with medical advice regarding my condition.

I was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April 2015. Since then, I have gone through an operation to have a stoma attach to my stomach and had received 8 chemotherapy sessions. The first 6th treatment, I was still able to take the side effects, but the 7th chemo treatment onward, I felt relatively weak.

After the last treatment and a CT scan, the oncologist told me that there is a swelling on my left kidney and was referred to the urologist. The urologist told me that the disease has pressed on my urinary tract which require an operation to have a permanent stoma bag for my urine. I am not comfortable with that idea as I am currently having a stoma bag for my solid waste, which has caused me a great due of stress. I told him that I will observe and monitor my situation first. The oncologist has also advise me to go for 2 more chemo treatment again with a different drug as my cancer marker had increase from 40 plus to 60 plus. The initial scan shows 1000 over and has significantly decrease to now. I am dishearten that I would need to go through chemotherapy again.

I am stuck at a crossroad now and I am seriously considering my next medical approach to recovery. I was introduced and recommended by one of a church member with regards to the medical services you provide at your center. I wish that it can be possible for me to receive treatment from you but I would like to hear from you first of your views to my condition.

I look forward to your reply. Thank you. Yours Sincerely. 

Reply:  Sorry SL, it is indeed very, very hard for me to say anything. The chemo has done a lot of damage to your body and your kidney. It is difficult for  me to repair such damage. Honestly, I really don’t know what to say. To go for more chemo?  — for what? But to tell you not to go for chemo is also not right. I suggest that you pray and ask God for guidance. Let Him guide you. And then follow what God tells you in your heart. If you want to know more about what I do, go to www.CancerCareMalaysia.com

Dear Dr. Teo,

I  have read up on the herbal therapy done at your clinic. After praying about it, I feel that it would be best for me to visit your clinic. I will be able to show you my medical reports and I hope you can advise me if I am suitable to receive treatment from you or not. If it’s possible, I would like to arrange for an appointment with you. Thank you.

Reply: Yes, you are welcome to come and see me Monday to Friday at about 11 a.m. You can come in the morning and return in the evening /afternoon. Let me know.

Case 2:  Meaningless Decline of CEA and Shrinkage of Liver Tumour After Chemotherapy
Patient 2 (P2) is 67 years old. His problems started in October 2014, when he had constipation and later passing out stools with blood. A colonoscopy was done which showed that he had colon cancer.

P2 underwent surgery.  Unfortunately, the cancer had spread to his liver. P2 had 5 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin. At the same he also took Xeloda for 5 cycles.

After chemotherapy, the CEA dropped and the tumour in his liver shrunk. Bravo!

But this great news did not last long. Soon afterwards, the CEA climbed up again and there were more and bigger tumours in his liver and other parts of the body.

Date CEA
8 January 2015 61.5 H – before chemotherapy
2 March 2015 38.2 H – while on chemo
4 May 2015   8.8 H
13 July 2015 10.7 H  – did more chemo!
19 October 2015 87.0 H  – more chemo, change drugs
CT scan 8 January 2015 – before chemotherapy 27 April 2015 – after 5 cycles of chemotherapy 11 August 2015 – before going for 2nd round of chemotherapy
1. There are hepatic hypodensities see in segments 6/7.

2. Largest is in segment 6 measuring 3.8 x 2.4 cm.

3. A new segment 7 lesion seen.

4. There is a nodule in the left inguinal canal.

5. There is a soft tissue mass present between the left 10th and 11th rib, suspicious of a metastatic deposit.

6. There is NO soft tissue thickening at the anastamotic site and laparotomy scar to suggest local recurrence.

1. Hypodensisties in segments 6 and 7 of the liver are all smaller. These are suspicious of metastases. No new lesion is seen.

2. A metastatic nodule to the right intercostal node is also smaller.

3. Left inguinal soft tissue suspicious for peritoneal spread of disease is also smaller.

4. No recurrence is seen at the bowel anastomic site.

  1. Interval increase in the number and size of liver hypodense lesions.

2. New hypodense lesions in segment 8/6, segment 4a/8, and segment 6/7.

3. Small left inguinal hernia with stable enhancing peritoneal thickening, suspicious for peritoneal metastasis.

4. No enhancing mass at the bowel anastomosis to suggest local recurrence.

Since surgery and the first round of chemotherapy did not cure P2, the doctor suggested more chemotherapy! Starting in August 2015,  P2 received another 3 cycles of chemotherapy with Oxaloplatin + oral Xeloda.  Unfortunately, these treatment was not effective. The CEA started to climb higher, from 10.7 in July to 87.0 in October 2015.

The doctor decided to change to another chemo regime. This time, P2 received Irinotecan + oral Xeloda. The doctor was not sure how many cycle P2 had to undergo with this regimen.

P2 said after the chemo:

  • The first week, he had no appetite and was tired.
  • The second week. he regained 50 percent of his wellbeing.
  • The third week, overall regained 80 to 90 percent of his health.

Since P2 showed during his consultation with us that he was still going to chemotherapy, we suggested that he goes home first and do not take any of our herbs.

Later, we received this e-mail from P2.

In your book you mentioned that those undergoing chemo can take capsule A and B to reduce the side effects.
Can I do that now ? I am more tired and the nausea lasted longer than before

Reply: If you want to continue taking the chemo — go ahead and complete your chemo first. When they cannot do anything else for you, then come and see me again. No use trying to make your own combination of treatment. Either you follow your doctor or you follow me.

Case 3: Surgery, chemo, radiation – the cancer spread to his lung 

In May 2014, I received an email below:

Dear Dr Teo,

Thank you very much for your kindness in helping the cancer patients.

My colleague (57 years old) had just underwent rectal tumour operation and he is very worried that he might have to go for chemotherapy or radiotherapy. For your information he is diagnosed with rectal cancer stage II. We would like to go to Penang to get consult you.

We met P3 and prescribed him with herbs. We also told him to take care of his diet, change his high-pressured-lifestyle and take it easy. During our meeting, P3 also told us that he was going to undergo dendritic cell therapy to be administered with a doctor whom he knows. The treatment originated from Japan and the whole treatment would cost something like RM 65,000.  Although I did not object to what he wanted to do, I told him about another patient who had similar treatment. He had lung cancer. Started the dendritic cell therapy in Singapore – it was a failure. He then flew to Japan and continued with more dendritic cell therapy. He died.

P3 apparently took our herbs and took care of his diet. Initially we saw P5 two or three times but after that he “disappeared from our radar.”

Later, we received this email.
Dear Prof. Dr. Chris Teo,

My blood test result is bad and is increasing daily

  • 19 May 2014 before undergoing dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 1.4.

I started consuming herbal medicine given by CA Care.

  • 4 July 2014 after completion of 6 X 4 jab (24 jabs) of dentritic cell therapy my CEA was 11.3
  • 9 July 2014 go for second opinion CEA was even higher 13.4 

This is very worrying and I am very concerned about metastatic spread. Please help.  How to stop the CEA to increase soonest.

I’ve just done my colonoscopy again this afternoon and the surgeon told me that the intestine is joining up well at my rectum and tomorrow morning at 11 am he is going to do the surgery by rejoining the intestine to my stomach and seal the hole. Expected to be admitted for a week. Best Regards.

P3 was again out of our radar, not until November 2015.  This is the email.

Dear Dr Teo,

It has been 15 months that since we last wrote to you.  How are you Dr Teo?  I wish that you are always in good health.  I still read your stories, write-up on your web-site.  Your kindness in helping the patients is greatly appreciated.

Patient  has been doing chemotherapy since August 2014 and has been monitored by the doctor closely.  However, recently he was informed by the doctor that the cancer cell had spread from the rectum (stage 4) to right lung.

We do not know what to do now as we think that he has been in the good hand all this while. Dr Teo,  please let us have your advice. Thank you very much.  

 Note: Chemotherapy since August 2014:

  • From 5-August 2014, chemo drugs used: oxaliplatin + 5FU + Avastin.
  • 13-10-2014, done IMRT (Intensity-modulated radiation therapy) for 6 weeks.
  • After IMRT, continued with chemo — Avastin, 5FU. Still ongoing.
  • 28-9-2015, had needle radiotherapy (radiofrequency ablation) because of 2 tiny spots on the right lung.
  • 19-10-2015, oxaliplatin was introduced again and 5 FU still on.

Since August 2014 the CEA was always higher than normal range and CEA dropped to within normal range in May 2015.  But for the past two months, the CEA was going up again.  His recent CEA was 14.7. 

Awaiting your comment please.

Case 4: Surgery and Xeloda did not stop this colon cancer from recurring

As we were dealing with many cases of colon cancer, a friend (P4) dropped by our centre. He is 70 years old and was diagnosed with rectosigmoid cancer in October 2014.

Chee LSeng Colon

P4 underwent a surgery and the histopathology report indicated a Duke Stage B cancer with no spread to the nodes or other parts of the body. After the discharge from the hospital, P3 was given oral chemo-drug, Xeloda which he took faithfully.

Barely a year later, October 2015, the cancer recurred. P4 underwent another surgery. The histopathology report confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, recurrent in the abdominal wall.

Now, what is P4 going to do now? He had two options: Go back to his doctor and undergo chemotherapy. Or, he come to us and opt for non-medical management of his cancer. P3 decided not to undergo further chemotherapy.

Let me ask you to reflect on these two quotations:

Insanity both

7 Repeating-error-over-and-ov

Let me end by sharing with you one case which fortunately seldom happen at CA Care — a patient who does not want to share his story.

P5 is a man in his early 50s. He flew in from Singapore to seek advice about his colon cancer. As he sat down to talk, he requested that this consultation should not be video-taped. I assured him that there is no need to worry — we would not stop our video-tapping but we would not use “his” video conversation with us.

I casually asked him: How do you come to know about us?

His answer: I went into your website and read the articles your wrote. I also watched the videos you put up in the You Tube!

My response: Oh you know about us because other patients would not mind sharing their stories, and I wrote their stories and used their videos in the website. But when it comes to your turn, you would not want to allow others to know about you!

P5 started to tell his story. Basically, he had problems of his bowel movements which he ignored for some time.  When things got worse, he decided to go to the hospital for help. Colonoscopy showed a big tumour in his colon. The doctor wanted him to undergo radiotherapy and chemotherapy first. These have to be done with the hope of shrinking the tumour first before proceeding with surgery.

P5 was not happy with the doctor’s suggestion. He would not want to go for chemotherapy or surgery. After learning about us, he decided to fly all the way from Singapore to see us. He was hoping to take our herbs and the tumour will go away. My answer to him: That is wishful thinking and “madness.” I have no such magic bullet. Go home and see your doctor. Let him remove the tumour first. After your surgery, you can come back again if you think I can help you.

Before leaving, P5 asked, How much do I have to pay for this consultation? I responded:  Pay nothing!

Having documented these cases, we have two other colon cancer stories to share with you. These two patients are unique in their own ways. And they are the kind of patients who made our day! Watch out for them:

  1. Conversation with a 34-year-old with colon cancer.
  2. Conversation with a 82-year old with colon cancer.

Metastatic Breast Cancer: She Found Her Healing

WP is a 45-year-old lady. Within a period of LESS than a year, all these happened.

  • In November 2014, WP had a lump in the right arm pit. A mammogram showed multifocal clusters of micro-calcification. A surgeon did a bad, piecemeal excision of the lump. Test confirmed it was an infiltrating ductal carcinoma with DCIS margins involved.
  • A week later, another surgery was done to remove the other remaining half of the lump.
  • WP consulted an oncologist in Singapore. She was asked to do a PET scan.
  • PET scan results showed:
  1. Small focal areas of mildly increased FDG uptake seen in the right breast — foci of satellite tumours have to be considered.
  2. There are several hypermetabolic lymph nodes noted in right axilla and in the pre-carinal region of the mediastinum. These findings are suspicious of metastatic nodal disease.
  3. No definite scan evidence of FDG avid hepatic, pulmonary and skeletal metastasis is noted.
  • WP was told she had a Stage 4 cancer and needed chemotherapy. She received her first shot of chemo in Singapore — AC regimen costing SGD 6,000 per cycle.
  • Not happy with the first oncologist, WP decided to seek another oncologist.
  • She did a total of 6 cycles of chemotherapy in Singapore. Since her cancer was Her-2 positive, WP was given Taxol + Heceptin. One injection of Herceptin cost SGD 4,000.
  • All treatments were completed in April 2015. Another PET scan was done. The results showed:
  1. The foci of increased FDG uptake in the right breast have resolved.
  2. The FDG-avid lymph nodes in the right axillary region and precarinal region of the mediastinum show interval metabolic resolution.
  3. No new suspicious FDG-avid lesion is detected.
  • In layman’s language the first round of chemo was a great success! But this success did not last long.
  • Six weeks later, a lump was again found in WP’s right breast. FNAC confirmed cancer.
  • The oncologist wanted WP to continue receiving Herceptin. Each treatment cost SGD 4,000 and WP will need to continue receiving Herceptin for life!
  • CT scan was done and it showed lung nodules.
  • In simple layman language the first round of chemo was a failure. It did not cure her.
  • WP was referred to a lung specialist who suggested a surgical removal of the infected nodes.
  • WP consulted a breast specialist in Kuala Lumpur and had a mastectomy (total removal of right breast).
  • A PET scan was again done on 11 August 2015. The results showed:
  1. There is interval development of several FDG-avid lymph nodes in the lower cervical, right supraclavicular, left internal mammary and medistinal regions. A consideration would be nodal metastases.
  2. A stable subcentimetre subpleural lung opacity without FDG-avidity in the right lower lobe is non-specific.
  • The breast specialist suggested more chemotherapy — the same advice as the oncologist in Singapore.
  • 18 August 2015, the breast specialist wrote: “The consensus on treatment from our Tumour Board was for her to complete her Herceptin and have radiotherapy to the chest well … radiotherapy to include the SCLN and Mediastinal LN as well as continuation of Herceptin and Perjeta in combination.”

After a month on CA Care Therapy, WP returned and said she was happy, confident and looked prettier! Listen to her.

 

Knee and joint Pains Gone After e-Therapy

WP suffered two side effects after her medical treatment.

  • After her surgery and axillary lymph nodes removal she felt numbness in her right arm. This is a very common problem suffered by patients.
  • After the chemo with Herceptin she had pains in her knees, ankles and joints.

Since WP planned to stay in Penang for 3 days, we took the opportunity to put WP on our e-Therapy.

After 3 sessions of the e-Therapy (each session lasted less than an hour) the numbness and pains were gone! Let WP tell you her experience.

 

Comments

Many cancer patients came to see us after all their medical treatments have failed them. We are their “last one stop”.  We also reminded them: Don’t expect us to cure you! We don’t have any magic bullet. You learn how to heal yourself. In this case, we are indeed glad to know that we can help WP in many ways — If you can eat, can sleep, can move and have no pain, don’t ask for more! Be grateful and be happy. WP had demonstrated to us that she had found her way to healing!

We always tell patients to ask two questions before undergoing any treatment (medical or alternative).

Before undergoing chemotherapy (radiation or surgery), did you ask the oncologist if the chemo is going to cure you?

WP did not ask this question when she met the first oncologist. But the second oncologist did tell WP that chemo would cure her cancer — saying, Many of my patients lived for 5 years.  To the doctors, surviving 5 years or more means cure, which unfortunately is not true.

I learned about Amy Cohen Soscia from the internet. She had breast cancer when she was 43-years old. Amy underwent a mastectomy, reconstructive surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She received treatments in one of the world’s outstanding cancer hospitals in the United States. In spite of the aggressive treatment,  Amy’s cancer spread to her liver and spine. She also received Herceptin. The cancer spread to her brain. More chemo drugs and radiation but these did not help her. Before she died, she wrote:

Capture2

In this case, WP had chemo with Herceptin. The treatment did not work. So, the oncologist’s respond was more chemo and top it up with radiation.  For the chemo, there is a new but expensive “bullet.”  This is the first time we heard about Perjeta.  What is it? Perjeta (chemical name: pertuzumab) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in combination with Herceptin (chemical name: trastuzumab), another targeted therapy medicine, and Taxotere (chemical name: docetaxel), a type of chemotherapy, to treat HER2-positive, metastatic breast cancer  (Perjeta was called Omnitarg in earlier studies).

Can Perjeta cure cancer? How much does it cost?

Perjeta helped patients with HER2-positive breast cancer live significantly longer. But how long is that?  According to a study rolled out at the European Society for Medical Oncology meeting, Perjeta helped half of patients live at least 15.7 months longer than patients in the control group, the study data shows. In the world of metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer, that’s a whopping result.”We’ve never seen anything like this before,” lead author Sandra Swain of MedStar Washington Hospital Center told The New York Times. “It’s really unprecedented to have this survival benefit.” Perjeta’s U.S. list price is about $5,900 per month, and it’s used in tandem with Herceptin, which costs $5,300 per month. Source: Roche’s Perjeta helps breast cancer patients live a record-setting 15.7 months longer

“Most patients will take the combination of Perjeta and Herceptin until their disease worsens, which is about 18 months,” the spokesperson said. “The estimated cost for a course of treatment … for 18 months is approximately $188,000.” Source: FDA approves Roche’s pricey new Herceptin partner, Perjeta.

Put this in the context of a patient in Malaysia. You need to spend RM 827,200 (current exchange rate of 4.4) to live for 18 months. The treatment does not cure you — does it prolong your sufferings?

Not too long ago, a friend whose wife had breast cancer was told by a renown oncologist: If you have a million or so, this is the time to spend your money, to show your concern for your wife. But the big question is, Can the treatment cure her? The answer is NO. My friend told me, It was a disgusting advice! We never went to him again.

One Indonesian cancer patient asked her oncologist if he could consider giving some discount for her chemo treatment. After all she had been receiving so many cycles of chemo from him but he could not cure her. The oncologist replied, Ask your husband to go and rob the bank to pay me.

Read more about medical cost: https://cancercaremalaysia.com/category/medical-costs-technology/

Reflect on the wisdom below:

Capture1

WP came to see us a month ago. She decided to believe in her own body in wanting to get well. She did not want to go for anymore medical treatment. Would you regret for making this decision? WP said she is now happier, healthier and prettier! Will she make it to another two years without having to spend a million bucks? Time will tell.

Ella was told without chemo she had only three months and with chemo she would live for two and a half years (no cure!). Ella forgo chemo and made it to seven years. And today she is still healthy! At CA Care, we have seen many Ellas (and you don’t have to rob the bank!). Praise God, the Almighty Healer.

Click on this link to browse through the many cases of breast cancer that we wrote about https://cancercaremalaysia.com/category/breast-cancer/

 

 

 

 

When Doctor’s Advice Does Not Add Up

CT is a 38-year-old Indonesian lady. About 3 years ago, she started to lose her hearing of the left ear. Later, pain developed on the left side of her head. In April 2015, the problem became more severe. She could not tell what others were saying around her. Then her left ear became deaf. When she lie down and sleep on her left side, she felt giddy. When standing with eyes closed, she lost her balance. The left arm was weak.

In May 2015, she came to Singapore and consulted an ENT specialist. She was given medication for a month. Her condition worsened. She came back to Singapore again in June and had an MRI.  There was a 3 cm tumour in her brain.

Composite

The doctor told CT to undergo surgery immediately. CT refused. CT and her husband came to seek our help in July 2015. Listen to our conversation that morning.

 

 

Husband: We saw a doctor (in Singapore). He told her to have an operation immediately. She refused.

Chris: Can surgery cure her?

H: Of course, can cure 99 percent. BUT have to operate the skull. Two doctors involved. One is ENT specialist and the other a neurosurgeon.

C: Why don’t you want to go for the operation?

Patient: But 5 percent of patients can’t swallow after that.

H: She cannot control her face muscle — muscle dead. Hearing gone, and cannot be restored.

C: How much is it going to cost you to operate?

H: Six hundred million rupiahs, about SGD 60,000.

C: After the operation, did the doctor say you need to go for chemotherapy?

P: No, because the tumour cannot be completely removed, I need to go for radiation.

C; You were told the operation is going to cure you — 99 percent. Now, the doctor said he cannot remove all the tumour. How can this be 99 percent cure when the tumour cannot be removed completely? Any logic?

H: That’s why — no logic!

P: My mom’s friend had the same problem like me. She went for an operation. She was not able to swallow after that. Saliva drooled out of her mouth.

C: What happened to her now?

P: She had improved but her two eyes are pointing inwards, not straight. Her husband said: Don’t go for operation, You will suffer a lot. She also had her operation in Singapore.

C: Are you very sure that you don’t want to go for the operation?

P: No operation. When the doctor said he can cure me, I want it …

H: The doctor said: We do this kind of operation everyday.

P: But the doctor said he cannot guarantee.

H: The doctor was scared of the nerve system.

C: So, it seems that 99 percent cure is not true then? I am aware that all patients want a cure. If I tell them that I can cure them, all will come to me. But I am going to be honest. I don’t want to bluff or mislead patients. Here we want to help you. Even if you take our herbs, don’t expect us to cure you.

Oh, this is a very difficult problem because there is a 3 cm tumour in there. To tell you NOT to go for surgery is not right. But if you don’t want to operate, I would not force you to do that either because I know that you may have to suffer many side effects.

Try to take the herbs — don’t expect us to cure you, but after a month or so, let’s see what happen. May be after this, it can give you an indication and direction — whether what we are doing is correct or not. Ask yourself — After taking the herbs, how do I feel? Better? Less problems? Worse? If better, then be patient and we continue.

We have helped many patients with brain tumour before.

For more read:

Brain Tumour Shrunk With Herbs: https://cancercaremalaysia.com/2010/12/11/brain-tumour-shrunk-with-herbs/

Brain Cancer: She Was in a Coma: https://cancercaremalaysia.com/2010/12/11/brain-cancer-she-was-in-a-coma/

Now, let us try our best to find a way out — to help you. The tumour is not going to disappear. But if you can lead a normal life, please don’t ask for more. After 3 months, if you find that the herbs do not help you, please go for the operation. I can’t help you anymore.

Comment

CT was told to undergo surgery immediately! Why immediately? She had been living with her problems for the past 3 years! No need to panic. Take time to evaluate your options.

When making your own decision, perhaps you want to reflect on the following:

10 You-decide-NO-treatment

11 Value-judgment-doc-cant-dec16 Groopman Choice within you17 Take-time-to-decide-no-hurr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stomach Cancer: No to surgery and chemo. Why?

EK is a 66-year-old female. About 2 years ago, she felt stomach discomforts after eating. If she had soft diet, then she was okay. She did nothing about this problem. During the Chinese New Year, 2015, she felt something blocking when she took food. Then she vomited. The problem went away after that. In June 2015, she went to a medical clinic and the doctor said she might have thyroid problem. However, an endoscopy and biopsy in July 2015 indicated stomach cancer.

EK and her son came to seek out help after being told that EK had to undergo chemotherapy followed by surgery. EK did not want to undergo these procedures. Why? Listen to our conversation that day.

 

 

Summary of our conversation

Chris:  Does your mother know about this?

Patient: Yes. When doing the scope, the doctor told me on the spot that I have cancer. The doctor then asked me to undergo chemo. Must decide immediately. Chemo is to shrink the tumour first. After that, they will operate me, to remove my stomach.

Son: He was trying to convince her to immediately proceed with the treatment. But when I did research on line the chemo does not work so well with diet causing cancer.

C: I understand. You are not the only one. Many others are like you too. You do not get cancer only yesterday. Perhaps it has been there for the past 5 or even 10 years already.

P: Only 2 years ago.

C: Perhaps 5 years ago it was already there but it did not show up and you did not feel anything. Most people do not “listen” to their body. For you, only now it shows up. What do you want to do? You have to decide. Correct, on the one hand you can have it removed and maybe it is gone. Do you want to operate?

P: I don’t want to operate. The doctor told me if I do not operate the tumour will grow. It may cause blockage and  bleeding. And it is going to be very painful.

C: The doctor said you have to do chemo first and then surgery. Did you ask him if these procedures are going to cure you?

P: No doctor would guarantee that.

S: Why I feel not satisfied is every time we discuss with the doctor — he never want to tell us the probability. They don’t know. Depend on patient, this can happen, that can happen. They don’t know and dare not go into this subject.

P: The doctor told me it is going to be 50: 50.

S: They never tell us about the side effects. What can happen after that? I spent about 2 weeks researching (in the internet) I know that there are a lot of (side effects).

C: Okay, take it easy. Relax. Go home and think about it and decide. Listen to your heart and not your head. If your heart says operate, then go for the operation. If your heart says no operation, then don’t do the operation.  Take it easy.

This is a major surgery. The whole stomach has to be removed. Understand this. If the cancer does not spread, then removing it is good. Clean and throw it away and it is gone. But if the cancer has already spread, that is where the problem is. If it has already gone to the liver, what do you do? Cut the liver also? It is hard for us to decide what is the best thing to do now.

After removing your stomach, you can’t eat anything you like any more. You need to adjust your diet. It is going to be a bit difficult.

Then that 50:50 chance — may be it may not end up 50:50 at all — we don’t know.

You can’t blame the doctor because that is all they know.

Then, back to this again. What if you do not do operate? First, the tumour may grow and block (the passage way). You cannot eat and vomit. So, you may have to face these problems.

All these basically mean — you cut, you die; you don’t cut you also die. But everybody also has to die. The question to ask is: How do you want to die? That is the most important thing.

If you go for surgery, you may die on the table. We don’t know.

P: Yes, that was what the doctor told me. If something goes wrong, you die.

C: You also need to know this. If you cut, you also need to suffer later … due to the chemo, etc. Go through all these sufferings and die. May be not worth it. This is one scenario. Another scenario is, now you are still well with no problem. If you can take care of yourself, maybe you don’t have to die sooner, may be you don’t have to suffer so much. But know that one day you have to die. So, which one do you want” Think for yourself.

You come and see us — can we cure you? No, we are not god. But we also know that we have helped a lot of people already. They don’t die that soon. But they have to learn how to help themselves. Learn how to live with your cancer. Tell your cancer — you stay in there but don’t disturb me, and I don’t disturb you. If I die, you (cancer) also die.

If there is blockage, then you have to go for surgery. If not, relax.

We know this is dangerous, we know this is a rare cancer. In one year, we do not see many case like this.

Okay, do you want to go home and think first what you want to do?

P: No, I don’t want surgery. Then go for chemo — no, my whole body would collapse! The doctor also told me that even if I did the operation, he would not be able to remove everything. May be something may be left behind. Because of that, I want to go for natural therapy.

C: Do you understand that it may not cure you? People come and ask us to cure them. Our answer is, No we cannot cure you. Because we know that cancer cannot be cured, but to help you — YES. But you have to want to help yourself first. But how long you want to help yourself is up to you. Some people get well after 6 months — they forget what we taught them after that!

S: Professor. Thanks for reminding us. I know in terms of diet, it is not easy to change.

Comments

EK and her son were desperate. And they need help. The doctor wanted her to go for chemo and surgery for her stomach cancer that had probably spread to the liver, pancreas, spleen and lymph nodes. In simple language, this is an advanced cancer,  where surgery alone cannot cure her.  The cancer cannot be totally removed. That means, the chance of recurrence is very high. In addition EK has to undergo chemotherapy. EK knew what she was asked to go into and decided not to follow the medical way.

EK and her son clearly need help. CA Care was set up to exactly to do this — to help those in need of direction and help. And we are ready to help. But for those who come to CA Care in search of “magic bullet” or any easy way out, then we say you have come to the wrong place. Please go elsewhere to shop for your cure.

EK’s son took time to browse the internet for more information. He was clearly unhappy that he could not discuss anything with the doctors. Understandable, doctors are busy people and they don’t have the time to explain things to the patients or their family members.  Read what Dr. Heymann wrote:

Doctor visit 12 minutes

It is unfortunate that doctors do not have the time to show much concern about the patients. EK was told right there and then, while doing the scope, that she has cancer and chemo has to be done immediately. The message came like a bomb. No doubt about, the “death sentence” as many like to call it, caused much anxiety and distress not only to the patient but also the entire family. Patients and their family members want to know MORE, but they cannot get much information from the doctor. At CA Care, we try our best to answer your concerns and provide information as honestly as we can — to empower you with knowledge so that you can make informed decisions.

Bill-Henderson-Informatin-i

While in the midst of writing this story, a patient came to our centre. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer that has spread extensively to his liver. After the CT scan, the doctor told him: We cannot operate you. We cannot chemo you. Go home, eat anything you like and go and play as much golf as you like. The patient told us, I know what that mean. The doctor virtually told me to go home and wait to die. It was indeed a great let down. We don’t know how he took it, knowing that this man was once the deputy head of a state government, a VVIP.  He and his wife spent about one and half hours at our centre. We answered everything that they wanted to know. No doubt, they were satisfied. They now know what they CAN and NEED to do next.

Read again what Dr. Jody Heymann wrote:

Hospital not concern of patients

Pose this question to the Power-that-Be, Given the above situation, what can we do to improve the situation? Is building more hospitals  the answer? Perhaps we don’t need expensive hospitals but train people who run hospitals with a more “human heart”.

I am fully aware too that during our consultation, I am often very blunt. To most people, may be the mention of the word “death” is a taboo and is very objectionable. But at CA Care, we often bring this subject up with the patients. This is because we want them to understand the bigger picture of the problem. We fully understand, ALL patients want to be cured of their cancer, no matter how advanced their disease may be. Many patients say they want to “fight” to the end. Well said, but do you still want to fight with the SAME weapons,  if you know with almost certainty that you are going to lose the war. In addition, you  suffer as a consequence. Some even leave a “big hole” in their bank account for the next-of-kin to settle. The only winners in the game are the doctors, hospitals and drug companies!

Perhaps you may wish to reflect on these two quotations:

47-Late-stage-cancer-no-tre

 

Chemo-Suffer-near-death

We are not implying here that patients with terminal cancer should just give up — go home and wait to die like the case of the VVP above. Far from it. Perhaps the question to ask is, If the expensive, scientific medicine cannot cure your cancer, can there be another option? At least another option which can allow patients to live in peace without suffering, even though we all know that cancer cannot be cured.

EK and the VVIP above did not give up. At least they came to CA Care and they found “peace” and a new “hope”.

 

 

 

Breast Cancer: Surgery, Chemo, Radiation and Hormonal Therapy Did Not Cure Her. Xeloda made her miserable! Patient, Only You Should Decide What You Want To Do!

Mdm PG was 59 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in June 2009. She immediately underwent a right mastectomy. Histology report indicated:

  • Three lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma.
  • Focal lympho-vascular invasion is seen at the periphery of the 2 small lesions.
  • Resection margins, skin and nipple are not involved by tumour.
  • 4 out of 13 axillary lymph nodes contain metastatic carcinoma, with focal extracapsular spread.
  • pT2N2aMx, Stage 3A

Prognostic factors:

  • Oestrogen receptor –   Moderate reactivity
  • Progesterone receptor –   Moderate reactivity
  • C-erb-B2 –  No reactivity
  • P53 –  Weak reactivity

PG underwent follow up chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She was also on Fermara (for 5 years). At the same time, she started to take herbs. The following is a brief summary of her treatment progress (extracted from the e-mails from her daughter).

May 2013 – almost 4 years after diagnosis

My mum is doing extremely well and I thank God every day for you and His protection over my mum’s life.  My mum recently went for her blood test and check-up again.  The doc said that her bones are getting brittle due to the regular intake of this hormonal pill that she has been taking every day for the past 3 years to keep her condition under control.  It is one of the side effects of this pill.  He is advising her to go through a kind of treatment to strengthen her bones.

I found out the name of the bone strengthener that the doc recommended to my mum.  It’s called “Zometa.”  It is an injection.  The hormonal pills that she has been taking is called ” Femara.”

October 2013

I would like to update you with regards to my mum’s latest blood test.  Her tumor marker is 5.9.  Her usual is 3.5.

January 2014

I would like to give you an update of my mum’s latest tumor marker result.

CEA 7.1  H
CA 125 29.4  H
CA 15.3 24.1  H

Her CEA is out of the normal range and it has escalated from 5.9  last Oct to 7.1 this week.  Both her CA125 and CA15.3 have also gone up even though it is still within the normal range.

The doc is suggesting for mum to go for a pet scan to find out the problem.

My sis and I are personally not so comfortable with her having to go through another cycle of invasive treatment should we find out if there is another growth elsewhere in her body.  We are really hoping that we can help treat mum’s condition with your herbs and diet advise.

February 2014

I’ve attached my mum’s latest report to show it to you.  The doctor said that there is a relapse and the lymph nodes behind her lungs are affected but there is no spreading to her organs which is a good thing.

The doc has changed her oral medication to Tamoxifen because her Fermara  doesn’t work anymore.  She recently went for a jab to protect her bones from turning brittle.

May 2014

Tumor markers on 7 May 2014
CEA 13.5  H
CA 125 64.5  H
CA 15.3 33.5  H

My mum went for her medical appointment yesterday. Result is negative. ..conditions of marker has worsen. Doc said there is a high chance of relapse but he doesn’t know which spot … could be bone, liver or kidney. If my mum does not wish to find out the cause, the doc can’t prescribe proper medication for treatment but he will change her current medication to see if there is any improvement upon her next visit on 19th June.
The doctor explained that the life span of such case if the patient refuses finding and treatment,  usually won’t pull through. The cancer cells will multiply very fast within a year and she will not make it.

Mum’s tumour marker in January this year comparing to now has escalated from  a marker of 7 to 14 now and another two marker have also increased from positive range now all to negative range. She is  physically very well but result has shown otherwise.

Doc suggested mummy to go for PET scan to at least find out what’s the problem so we can seek early treatment since she is still healthy now. And not wait till she turns fragile and can’t proceed with any more treatment.

March 2015

My mum’s cancer marker has apparently gone up quite a bit recently and the doc said that there are tumours growing quite rapidly in her body that explains why the cancer marker is high. The doc asked if my mum has been taking any other medication that is causing interference with his. And he immediately changed my mum’s medication from tamoxifen to Exemestane Aromasin 25mg per tab and he is trying to see if the new medication can help control her tumour  growth.

The nurse warned my mum about all the side effects. My sister advised my mum to stop taking your herbs and see if there is any improvement with the western medication alone because she also believes that there could be that possibility of your herbs clashing with the oncologist’s prescription. I personally am against the idea of my mum stopping your herbs temporarily.

Doc mentioned since last year that cancer has spread to her bones and there are tumours found around her chest outside her lungs and other parts of her body too. He said it was a good thing that it didn’t spread to her organs. I’m a little worried that my mum will eventually feel the adverse side effects of her new medication if she continues with it and not take your herbs. I’m really concerned.. Anyways, no matter what the doctor said and her deteriorating condition, my mum is still in high spirits and her appetite is well and she still goes to church and play mahjong with her friends regularly like a healthy person. Her strong belief in God keeps her in good spirits too.

June 2015

I am wondering if I can bring my mum to come see you on. She has been taking Xeloda for the past one month and the sole of her feet started to turn black since last week.  I am not sure if it is due to Xeloda.  Would love to show you her feet. Blood test also showed that her glucose level is very high.  So I am not sure if she could be diabetic.

Not sure if Xeloda is the culprit? Just read the internet.

Side effects of Xeloda: Hand-Foot Syndrome

Hand-foot syndrome, also called palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, is a side effect of some types of chemotherapy.  In mild to moderate hand-foot syndrome, the following symptoms may occur on the palms of the hands and/or the soles of the feet:

  • Redness (similar to a sunburn)
  • Swelling
  • A sensation of tingling or burning
  • Tenderness (sensitive to touch)
  • Tightness of the skin
  • Thick calluses and blisters on the palms and soles

Symptoms of severe hand-foot syndrome include:

  • Cracked, flaking, or peeling skin
  • Blisters, ulcers, or sores on the skin
  • Severe pain
  • Difficulty walking or using the hands

The drugs that may cause hand-foot syndrome include:

  • Axitinib (Inlyta)
  • Cabozantinib (Cometriq)
  • Capecitabine (Xeloda)
  • Cytarabine (Cytosar-U)
  • Docetaxel (Docefrez, Taxotere)
  • Floxuridine (FUDF)
  • Fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil)
  • Idarubicin (Idamycin)
  • Liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil)
  • Doxorubicin (Adriamycin)
  • Sunitinib (Sutent)
  • Sorafenib (Nexavar)
  • Pazopanib (Votrient)
  • Paclitaxel (Taxol)
  • Vemurafenib (Zelboraf)
  • Regorafenib (Stivarga)

Not everyone who is treated with these medications develops hand-food syndrome. The severity of hand-foot syndrome can vary from person to person, even among people taking the same medication for the same form of cancer.

Source: http://www.cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/side-effects/hand-foot-syndrome-or-palmar-plantar-erythrodysesthesia

Lisa Bonchek Adams  was 37 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. After all the medical treatments in one of the world’s best cancer hospitals (in New York), she died in March 2015.  In her blog, Lisa wrote about her experience with Xeloda:  http://lisabadams.com/2012/11/

… the end of the (chemo) round ended up bringing hand/foot syndrome  from the Xeloda. Hand/foot syndrome is not the same as neuropathy (though it may include some of those symptoms), which many people on chemotherapy experience.Hand/foot syndrome is associated with a few particular drugs, Xeloda is one. The capillaries in your hands and feet leak and/or rupture, causing the chemo to spill into the extremities. This causes them to be extremely red, swollen, painful, sensitive to touch, cracked, peeling, and potentially ulcerating. Numbness and tingling also accompany the condition.For the past month I’ve been trying to keep these effects at bay, but eventually the toxicity builds up. Fine motor activities like tying shoes are hard at the moment, anything that touches/puts pressure on hands and feet. Thankfully I have some shoes with furry insides and cushioning. Socks must be worn 24/7 and slippers at all times. Holding the steering wheel is uncomfortable but doable, thankfully …

Our Meeting and Advice

We got to meet Mdm PG and her daughter in mid-June 2015. GP looked great but she felt miserable inside. She told us that she did not suffer any effects taking Xeloda during the first week. After the second week things started to get worse. She had sores in her mouth, both hands and soles peeled making walking difficult. Then she felt “tired” throughout the day.  She was not able to continue living the “good life” she had earlier on.

The daughter said, “before the Xeloda she was okay. Able to walk about, taking the bus anywhere she wanted to do. She can spend time playing mahjong, etc. Now she can’t do that anymore. She look good and healthy before that. But the doctor said, she was not healthy because the blood test was bad. Now, after the Xeloda her blood result was better, but she was feeling bad.”

PG reminded us that when she was diagnosed with (Stage 3) cancer, the doctor told her that she could last about 3 years if she did all the treatments. Now, it is already 6 years. She believed the herbs did help her. But now living such a miserable life after Xeloda, life has not much meaning anymore.

PG told us that she has 2 daughters – both love her very much and wanted her to live as long as possible. But unfortunately, these  2 daughters  have their own ideas about her treatment. One daughter wanted to strictly the doctor’s treatment while another daughter wanted her to go for herbs and was not happy with all those medical drugs. PG said, they started to “quarrel in front of me and that left me in a limbo — not knowing what to do and who to please!”

Indeed, we have “sensed” this feeling all along when we read the many emails the daughter wrote us. So, this meeting was a good opportunity for us to give our advice frankly and directly. These are what I told PG:

  • You have already understood that nobody on earth can cure cancer. Even with medical treatment the doctor already told you would only last 3 years. Now, it is 6 years. Look at it in a positive way. You have been well blessed. During these years, you did not suffer and have lived a good life (unlike now due to Xeloda). PG responded, I am aware of this. I have been taking your herbs and I felt well. Your herbs helped me a lot.
  • If you can eat, can sleep, can move around and have no pain, please don’t ask for more. Be ever grateful to God for this.
  • No one lives forever, even for those who are supposed to be healthy. One day, I too would return “home.” So let us not fear death because no one can escape this reality. I have read many books of people who have “gone” and saw “heaven” and came back to earth. They said, Up There, it is so beautiful – calm and peaceful, free from all miseries. So why are we so afraid to go there?  Don’t be afraid.
  • We fully understand the dilemma you are in — trying to please both daughters, but each wanting you to take a different path. I am afraid I cannot decide for you and tell you what to do. You will have to make your own decision. Let each of your daughter know what is important for you in life. Tell them how you feel and they must respect your wishes.
  • If you feel that you want to endure all the suffering undergoing more medical treatments, go ahead and tell your daughters you want to do exactly that. If you cannot endure these sufferings and want to just go on herbs, say that out clearly to your daughters. Your daughters should respect and honour your wishes.
  • You need to tell your daughters that what you want to do, is entirely your decision and they should not feel guilty or responsible for whatever the outcome. In this way, there would be “peace.”
  • The last thing — which is a real disaster — to have family members quarrelling among themselves.

23 June 2015

Thank you so much for taking time out to see my mum and I the other night.We are eternally grateful. Words cannot describe how grateful I am. I can never repay your kindness. My sis will still be bringing my mum to see the oncologist the next few days. Hopefully she will make a firm decision and not be swayed by their persuasion. She is recovering well, Dr.

============================================

5 July 2015

Hi Dr Chris,

Guess what?  My mum has decided not to continue with the Chemo treatment anymore.  She told my family and her friends that she will depend solely on your herbs to help stabilise her condition.  Praise The Lord!  She is very diligent in taking your herbs everyday now.

===============================================

 

 

 

Surgery, Radiation and Chemo Did Not Cure Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour (Neurofibrosarcoma)

Alex (not real name) is 23 years old. He was born with a certain nerve disorder. His right arm had many benign lumps. When he was 11 years old, his right palm started to swell. He could not write with his right hand anymore.

Composite-1-Hand

Alex underwent a debulking surgery — the lumps were removed. He was told that it was not cancerous. Later in September 2013, there was a swelling in his right arm pit. The mass grew bigger and became painful.

Composite-2-Armpit

A CT scan in January 2014 indicated:

  • A large axillary mass — malignancy needs to be considered. The right subclavian, axillary and brachial arteries pass above and lateral to this mass.
  • No evidence of lung or mediastinal metastasis.

A true-cut biopsy was done and indicated:

  • High grade spindle cell sarcoma favouring malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

Alex underwent an operation to remove this entire right upper limb. Below is the surgeon’s note indicating the extensiveness of the surgery.

Alaister Lim scan

Histopathology confirmed a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (T2bNoMo), Stage 3.

After the surgery Alex received 32 times of radiation treatment. There was no other medication.

Barely six months later, August 2014, the cancer spread to his lungs. Alex underwent 3 cycles of chemotherapy. The treatment was not effective. Alex again had more chemo — 12 cycles in all. The drugs used were Gemzar and Cisplatin.

lung--600

In February 2015, follow up examination showed:

  • Mixed response of the lung nodules. Some nodules are smaller but some previously small ones are larger.
  • A new nodule seen in the left upper lobe adjacent to the left 4th rib.

Chemotherapy did not help control his lung metastasis. Alex decided to give up medical treatment and came to seek our help.

Comment

It is indeed a sad story. As we talked to Alex, we had full admiration for his determined spirit. No, he did not sulk in spite of the fact that he had gone very rough patches since he was born. When he was not able to write with his right hand, he learned to write with his left. He attended university in Australia. When asked if there was anyone taking care of him there, he replied, No, I took care of myself. When medical treatment failed him, he said he wanted to try another way. There was no sign of bitterness in his voice. And he was determined to live.

Internet information about malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors — MPNSTs (also called neurofibrosarcomas):

  • are a type of cancer that occurs in the protective lining of the nerves that extend from the spinal cord into the body.
  • can occur anywhere in the body, but most often occur in the deep tissue of the arms, legs and trunk.
  • tend to cause pain and weakness in the affected area and may also cause a growing lump or mass.
  • occur more frequently in people with an inherited condition that causes nerve tumors (neurofibromatosis) and in people who have undergone radiation therapy for cancer.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/malignant-peripheral-nerve-sheath-tumors/basics/definition/con-20035841

  • are aggressive, locally invasive soft tissue sarcomas, typically presenting as a rapidly growing and painful lump.
  • these tumours account for up to 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas.
  • a common cause of nerve sheath tumors is neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).
  • Evans et al. estimate the lifetime risk of developing MPNSTs in the population of patients with NF1 to be as high as 13%.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/sarcoma/2009/756395/

  • a very rare tumor, with an incidence of 1 per 1,00,000 population.
  • these tumors may arise spontaneously in adult patients, although 5% to 42% of MPNST have an association with multiple neurofibromatosis Type-I

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1560134/

  • are rare sarcomas with one of the poorest prognoses of all the soft tissue sarcomas.
  • information about adjuvant treatment is scarce.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21303750

  • NF1 is an autosomal dominant condition with a birth incidence of about 1 in 2500 and a prevalence of 1 in 4000.

http://jmg.bmj.com/content/39/5/311.full

  • A peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) is a neoplasm arising from a peripheral nerve.
  • All ages and both sexes may be affected by PNSTs.
  • Sporadic MPNSTs are most common between 40 and 50 years of age, while those occurring in the setting of NF1 are diagnosed some 10 years earlier.

http://atlasgeneticsoncology.org/Tumors/PeriphNervSheatID5094.html

  • Peripheral nerve tumors are uncommon and many neurologists will see only a handful in their careers, unless they have a practice enriched in patients with neurofibromatosis.

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/peripheral-nerve-tumors

  • The role of chemotherapy in advanced malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is unclear.

http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2010/07/23/annonc.mdq338.full

  • MPNSTs are highly aggressive in NF1. Conventional chemotherapy does not seem to reduce mortality, and its role must be questioned.

http://www.ojrd.com/content/8/1/127

  • The recommended treatment of this type of sarcoma is the surgical extirpation including wide margins and complementary radiotherapy.However, the prognosis is poor. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S174194090500004X
  • Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are rare soft tissue sarcomas. They are considered to carry a poor prognosis with current therapeutic approaches.

http://www.casesjournal.com/content/2/1/7612

  • Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are uncommon, biologically aggressive soft tissue sarcomas of neural origin that pose tremendous challenges to effective therapy.
  • Prognosis is generally poor, with high rates of relapse following multimodality therapy in early disease, low response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy in advanced disease, and propensity for rapid disease progression and high mortality.
  • MPNSTs comprise ∼2% of all sarcomas, a small fraction of a group of cancers that affect 5 people per million per year.
  • Whereas MPNST may arise at any age with no gender predilection, it tends to present earlier in life than most other complex sarcomas.
  • Half of MPNSTs are associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the autosomal dominant condition that, affecting 1 in 3000 live births, represents the most common human cancer genetic predisposition syndrome.
  • The lifetime risk of developing MPNST in a patient with NF1 syndrome is 8%–13%.
  • In general, MPNST is known to have high metastatic potential and poor prognosis.
  • As is the case with all soft tissue sarcomas, complete surgical extirpation with clear margins is the treatment of choice.
  • In the case with most large (>5 cm) high-grade limb sarcomas, adjuvant radiation is advocated to reduce local recurrence. The risk-benefit profile of adjuvant radiation in patients with NF1 must be carefully discussed with all patients in view of the heightened risk of radiation-induced sarcomas.
  • There are no randomized data examining adjuvant chemotherapy specifically in MPNST.

http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/19/2/193.full

 

 

 

Kidney Cancer Spread to the Lung Six Months After Surgery

SS is a 71-year-old male. Three years ago, in 2012, his urine contained traces of blood. A checkup in a private hospital showed:

  • Normal meatus (urinary meatus is the opening or hole at which urine comes out of the urethra) and urethra (theurethra  is a tube that connects the urinary bladder to the urinary meatus for the flow of fluids from the body. In male  the urethra travels through the penis, and carries semen as well as urine).
  • Mildly enlarged prostate, measures 5.5 x 4.0 x 3.8 cm.
  • Both kidneys are well visualised and shows a normal echo pattern with no focal lesion within it. No renal stones seen and there is no evidence of any hydronephrosis.
  • Creatinine level was elevated, at 156.8 (normal 63.6–110.5).
  • Fatty liver change.

SS was prescribed some medications. The bleeding stopped and he was well for two years.

One day in late 2014,  SS had pains when he turned his body from the right to the left. USG on 9 October 2014 showed:

  • Fatty liver change. No focal liver lesion.
  • A cyst with wall calcifications on the upper pole of the right kidney measuring 8 x 7 mm.
  • There is a lobulated hypoechoic lesion in the upper two thirds of the left kidney measuring 7.0 x 6.8 x 6.2 cm.
  • No hydronephrosis seen.

A CT scan, done on 16 October 2014, showed the following:

  • Small cyst in the upper pole of the right kidney measuring 5 xc 5 mm in size. No mass or focal lesion noted.
  • An irrregularly enhancing mass infiltrating almost the whole of the left kidney sparing the power pole measuring 7.8 x 6.2 x 10.3 cm.
  • Enlarged lymph nodes noted medially measuring 2.5 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm and 1.8 x 1.6 x 1.0 cm.
  • Subcentimeter paracaval and para-aortic lymph nodes.

Comp-Kid-ca

 

SS underwent surgery to remove his left kidney. The histopathology report dated 21 October 2014 indicated:

  • Grade 3 transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis, T4N2Mx, Stage 4.
  • Two (2/10) hilar lymph nodes contain deposits of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma.
  • Free of metastatic tumour deposits.

The operation was a success (later you would want to ask if this is really true?) and everything was alright. SS was asked to go for chemo, he refused. Routine check up three months later showed everything was perfect. Another routine three-month check up on 22 January 2015 also showed perfect result.

Six months after surgery, 2 June 2015, X-ray showed an oval nodule in the left mid zone of the lung, measuring 13 x 12 mm. This nodule was not seen in the previous chest radiograph on 22 January 2015. An underlying metastatic deposit is considered.

CT scan of the thorax on 4 June 2015 showed:

  • A nodule in the apical segment of the left lower lobe measuring 15 x 12 x 13 mm.
  • Another smaller nodule is noted in the lingular segment of the left upper lobe measuring 5 x 5 x 5 mm.
  • These are suspicious of metastatic deposits.

Composite-Lung-Metastasis

SS was asked to go for chemotherapy. He went to consult an oncologist. Listen to this video.

 

 

You want me to do chemo, but I only have one kidney left. How does that affect me?

No problem. We shall use the drugs, carboplatin + Gemzar.

Can you cure me?

No cure. There is no cure for cancer! We shall go for 3 cycles first and see what happen.

Each cycle of chemo is going to cost RM 5,000.

After the chemo (and this is not a cure) how long do I have?

I am not God

I know that you are not God.

Probably you have six months to a year! I can’t say, all depends on yourself!

(Depend on luck? Fong shui? If this being the case, where is the so called “science” in oncology then?)

 

 

 

Can the best of medicine in the world cure brain cancer?

This week, there are 3 sad stories about brain cancer.

The Brain Tumor That Killed Beau Biden http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/05/31/the-brain-tumor-that-killed-beau-biden.html

  • On Saturday, Joseph “Beau” Biden, the son of Vice President Joe Biden and former attorney general of Delaware, died following a long battle against brain cancer.
  • The 46-year-old’s death raises new questions about the disease that killed him—one that’s alarmingly common in adults and chronically misunderstood by the public.
  • This past year there were nearly 70,000 new cases and 14,000 deaths from this disease.
  • There are many different types (of brain cancer) that occur in adults—each with a unique set of features. Each types carries with it a separate prognosis—ranging from a life expectancy of eight months to non-life threatening.
  • Glioblastoma is an aggressive and often fatal tumor, with an estimated 2-year survival rate of around 17 percent for patients between 40 and 65 years old. The underlying cause of GBM is unknown.
  • It’s still unclear which specific type of tumor that Biden suffered from, but whether malignant or benign, it’s clear that the treatment to keep it from coming back ultimately failed.
  • Treatment options typically include a combination of radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery. The goal of surgery is usually to reduce the tumor burden, followed by radiation therapy and certain chemotherapeutics. Chemotherapy may delay the disease course in some cases, but most chemotherapeutic agents for GBM have an extremely low response rate, around 10 percent. The prognosis is not particularly good for any age group.

Brain cancers like Beau Biden’s kill about 15,000 adults each year http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2015/05/31/brain-cancers-like-beau-bidens-kill-about-15000-adults-each-year/

  • A variety of malignant brain and central nervous system tumors kill about 15,000 people in the United States each year, often after difficult courses of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Beau Biden was first diagnosed in August 2013 and after surgery, radiation and chemotherapy returned to normal duties in November that year. But his cancer recurred this spring, and he began treatment again at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.
  • Former Massachusetts senator Edward M. Kennedy died in August 2009, 15 months after he suffered a seizure and was diagnosed with a malignant glioma, the most common form of brain cancer.
  • For most incurable brain tumors, the primary challenge is managing the portions of the tumor that are undetectable by diagnostic imaging, These tumor cells are often the source of recurrence, traveling undetected to other brain regions of the patient and then driving the formation of new areas of growth with little warning. Most malignant brain tumors eventually recur.

Beau Biden fought bravely before losing battle with brain cancer; here are the lessons you should learn  http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/doctor-lessons-beau-biden-death-article-1.2242753

  • Beau Biden had been dealing with health problems since 2010, when he suffered from a stroke.
  • Three years later … after he suddenly felt disorientated and weak during a vacation, he was admitted to M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Not long after that, he was diagnosed with brain cancer. He underwent surgery and was free of the cancer; however, it returned this spring.
  • Biden underwent aggressive treatmentat Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.
  • We do not know what causes brain cancer. Most brain tumors are not linked to any known risk factors. While there is no proof that radiation causes cancer, we do know that radiation is not good for you. The use of cell phones has long been led to debate about whether they may increase a person’s risk for brain cancer. Current research shows conflicting results. Regardless, it is probably a good idea to limit cell phone use as much as possible or at least use a hands-free headset to reduce your exposure to radiation.

Beau Biden Dies at 46 From Brain Cancer: Why the Disease Is So Hard to Beat https://www.yahoo.com/health/beau-biden-dies-at-46-from-brain-cancer-why-the-120362278807.html 

  • Details about Biden’s healthprior to his death are scarce. What is known is that he was hospitalized the week up until his death at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, and that he did have a small lesion removed from his brain in 2013 at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, but was given a clean bill of health after the procedure.
  • …. brain tumor is known to have a high propensity for returning, even after being successfully removed
  • No matter what, almost all the time you’re talking about a kind of tumor that is going to come back and become more resistant to therapies,” Weiss, who specializes in treating adult malignant and benign brain tumors, tells Yahoo Health. “That’s why you hear these patients have a brain tumor, a primary brain tumor, and they’ve been given a clean bill of health. But they’re never really in a position” to have a clean bill of health for the rest of their lives, she says.

Case from Singapore

Someone from Singapore sent me this message:

Dear Doctor Chris,

Thank you for reading this message! I know it is hard for u to make any diagnosis without seeing the patient – but can I just ask before I bring my 32 year old wife over from Singapore if you are able to help her treat Glioblatoma Multiforme Grade 4 brain cancer. She has done surgery to remove 70% of tumor on 28 April and has not started on Chemo/ Radiation. We hope to let her do Immmunotherapy (T cell) before bringing her to u for treatment – do u advise that and know of a reliable hospital/ clinic in Malaysia for recommendation? Please for your kind advice!

Reply: I have bad impression of IT!

Can we seek your treatment for glioblastoma? … can we please seek your help for her glioblastoma?

Reply: Unfortunately … no cure from that ca

Can extend? For how long?

 Reply: Can’t say or predict. 

Case from Penang

May 30, 2015 at 4:20 PM,

Dear Dr Chris Teo,

My sister is a cancer patient with brain tumors, grade 4, high grade glioblastoma.

Sep 2013- She fainted and was sent to hospital, scan showed she had some bleeding in her brain.

Oct 2013- another scan showed that she had a 3cm big tumor.

She had her tumors removed in Oct 2013 by X of General Hospital Penang due to emergency.

Oct 2014-her tumors grew back and scan report found that there’re 5 tumors.

She had undergone 2 sessions of radiotherapy and 3 sessions of chemotherapy since then.

There is no more chemotherapy for her. Her brain swell every week and had to go for dripping and treat with mannitol.

She has strong will to survive as she has a 4 year old daughter. Please save her. We would like to make an appointment with you to see if there’s any advice from you.

I look forward to your reply. Warm regards.

Reply: I am sorry I cannot save her. Her cancer is very, very difficult.

Dear Dr Chris Teo,

Thank you for your reply.

Although it looks like her condition is very critical but she has very good blood test report, all her other organs are functioning very well.

Other than her speech problem and body coordination due to her brain’s tumors, she has clear mind, strong surviving will, she eats very well and pass motions and urine as normal person.

I just feel that if you’ve any herbs that can help to alleviate the swell and cancer cells in her brain, that would be very helpful.

My mother and her husband are there at your clinic now to seek your opinion. Please at least give them some advice.  My mother has been very careful in her diet … It was very surprise to see a glioblastoma cancer patient to survive more than 5 months. My sister has already passed her 1.5 years after diagnosed.

This 29-year-old patient (on wheel chair), her husband and mother came to see us. The following is a letter from her oncologist:

Mdm H is my patient since 2014 with brain cancer, now recurrence with multiple nodules in the brain. This has left her with weakness of her limbs, unsteady gait and double vision. She is therefore dependent and reliant on her carers for mobilising and self-care at home. Her disability is deemed permanent in view of her recurrence of cancer in the brain. She gets agitated and irritated due to her tumour in the brain. Hope you will understand the emotional changes that she is going through due to her illness.

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Mdm H underwent surgery on 18 October 2013. This was followed by 30 sessions of radiation and 2 cycles of chemotherapy given as 12 injections. The drug used was Avastin.

By 2 September 2014, H was told that there was NO MORE cancer! Her mother said H was cured!

Unfortunately, about 2 months after this “great news” the cancer came back again. H again underwent chemotherapy. After the 11th injection, the oncologist in a private hospital told her to go and seek further treatment in a government hospital.  As far as he is concerned he could not help H anymore.

At this point, the family decided to come to us for help. I told the family. I cannot cure your cancer. 6 Surgery Tobias Brain ca

It is indeed sad that patients and their families don’t seem to understand that surgery does not cure any cancer (unless it is of a very early stage).  Listen to this: 5 Ssurgery come back again

Over the years, I have come across many cases of brain cancer. Here are some of their stories:

Brain Tumour: Operation, you have an 80 percent chance of cure! Do you believe that?

Brain Cancer: Surgery and Radiotherapy. Died

Brain Cancer: Radiotherapy – Recurrence; Chemo – Recurrence; and Avastin – Dead

Helping a Six-Year-Old with Cancer of the Brain Stem

Brain Tumour: Herbs and e-Therapy Helped Him

Brain Cancer – Marvelous Technology, Dismal Outcome

Brain Cancer – Yet She Lives !

Brain Cancer: She Was in a Coma

Declined Surgery Only On Herbs

Brain Tumour Shrunk With Herbs

 

 

After All Else Failed They Came to CA Care. Case of Intracranial Malignant Melanoma

Hui is a 9-year old girl. At birth she had many birth marks/moles ( medically referred to as naevus or naevi).  Over the years, these marks became itchy. Other than that Hui had no problem until September 2014, when she was 8 years old. Hui started to vomit, had headaches and seizure. MRI done on 11 September 2014 indicated “a solid mass lesion in the right thalamus measuring 40 x 42 x 43 mm.”

Where is the Thalamus?

 Thalamus

The thalamus is a small structure within the brain located just above the brain stem between the cerebral cortex and the midbrain and has extensive nerve connections to both. The main function of the thalamus is to relay motor and sensory signals to the cerebral cortex. It also regulates sleep, alertness and wakefulness. http://www.news-medical.net/health/What-is-the-Thalamus.aspx

A biopsy was done and the result showed “features are more in favour of malignant melanoma… in view of the presence of pigmented skin lesions.”

Hui underwent an operation  (crionotomy and EVD insertion) on 2 October 2014. “An attempt to debulk the tumour was abandoned as the tumour was very vascularised.” However, tumour debulking was finally done on 3 October 2014. Histopathology report confirmed malignant melanoma.

A follow up MRI on 11 November 2014 showed “no evidence of residual tumour or tumour recurrence.”

Barely 3 months later, MRI on 30 December 2014, showed tumour recurrence, “it measures approximately 3.1 x 2.3 x 3.7 cm. It appeared to be progressively increasing in size.”

At this point, the parents refused to have further medical treatment as they wanted to try alternative treatment.

On 1 February 2015, Hui had headaches again and started to vomit. She was rushed to the emergency. An urgent CT scan of the brain showed “a dense tumour measuring 5.3 x 3.5 x 5.9 cm with evidence of intratumoural hemorrhage” (internal bleeding).  A left front EVD was inserted to drain the hemorrhage. (EVD: external ventricular drain extraventricular drain; or ventriculostomy. A plastic tube is placed by neurosurgeon to drain fluid from the brain).

A skin biopsy was done over the right giant naevus (birthmark). The result showed “benign intra-dermal naevus”.

Hui underwent another operation – “right re-crionotomy and tumour debulking” on 12 February 2015.  The father said the  tumour was cut out but unfortunately the tumour expanded and the skull could not be put back. Hui was discharged and went home with her head without the “sawn off” skull. However, she was alright and was able to move around.

Unfortunately Hui developed persistent vomiting. A repeat CT scan on 27 February 2015 showed increasing hydrocephalus (fluid) and 2 VP shuntswere inserted. “A revision of the shunt was performed on 3 March 2015 as it was not properly placed.

Her doctor wrote, ” She was quite well since then,  and was discharge on 6 March 2015. We are greatly sorry for not being able to do MRI brain for her as our machine was broken down and her unstable conditioin.”

Hui was referred to KLGH for radiation. The parents were undecided whether to undergo radiotherapy or not and came to seek our advice. According to her parents, Hui was very weak.

Comments

It is indeed a hard case for us to handle. Should Hui undergo radiotherapy? We cannot provide that answer. The parents will have to make that decision.

We have seen many “disastrous” results after a brain operation.

2 Surgery-as-last-resort

4 When not to operation

Dr. Jeffrey Tobia and Kay Eaton (in Living with Cancer) wrote: As far as cure is concerned, there is no use pretending that brain tumours are truly curable.

5 Ssurgery come back again

Update:

This is a message we received on 18 August 2015, from the monk who brought Hui to see us.

On a sad note, the young girl with the brain melanoma passed away on Thursday morning after lapsing into unconsciousness for a week. After we saw you, she underwent the Gamma knife therapy in KL the following week and a couple more VP shunts. The tumours re-grew in about a week in different areas of the brain.

What to do now? Do we have to give up? Here is a sweet story that crossed our path – a melanoma case that had spread to the lungs.

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Comic available at: http://bookoncancer.com/productDetail.php?P_Id=73

 Information from the Internet

Metastatic Intracranial Melanoma

  • Melanoma is a malignancy of melanocytes, which are pigment-producing cells derived from the neural crest. This condition constitutes 3% of all cancers diagnosed in the United States; it is the most lethal form of skin cancer and the third most common malignancy that causes central nervous system (CNS) metastases, after lung and breast cancer. The primary tumor may occur at any location on the skin or, less commonly, on the mucus membranes or other locations. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1158059-overview
  • Malignant melanoma (MM) is often reported as the third most common cause of intracranial metastasis after carcinoma of the breast and lung. Most patients with advanced MM will have widespread extracranial disease, but the majority will die from intracerebral spread. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7834426
  • 7% of patients diagnosed with melanoma subsequently developed intracranial metastasis. The prognosis of cerebral metastatic melanoma is dismal. Without treatment, the average survival time from the beginning of neurologic symptoms was 65 days in one study . Even with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the survival time has only been extended to a range of 4 months to approximately 2 years. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/intracranial-metastatic-melanoma-2
  • Primary intracranial melanoma is uncommon and accounts for only approximately 1% of all cases of melanoma. http://www2.cmu.edu.tw/~mtjm/full-text/7%282%29p118-123.pdf
  • Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in 10 to 40% of patients with melanoma. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197072/

Treatment

  • Disseminated metastatic disease, including brain metastases, is commonly encountered in malignant melanoma. The classical treatment approach for melanoma brain metastases has been neurosurgical resection followed by whole brain radiotherapy. Traditionally, if lesions were either too numerous or surgical intervention would cause substantial neurologic deficits, patients were either treated with whole brain radiotherapy or referred to hospice and supportive care. Chemotherapy has not proven effective in treating brain metastases.

Prognosis

  • Metastatic melanoma patients overall have a median survival of only 6–10 months and a 5-year survival of less than 10% .There has been virtually no improvement in survival of those patients in the past several decades. http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jsc/2011/845863/

 

After All Else Failed They Came to CA Care. Case of Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma

Within the first three weeks of March 2015, six patients came to seek our help. Each had his/her own tragic story to tell. By documenting this story it is our hope that you or your loved ones can learn something more than just “going to the doctor or healer” to seek treatment.

John (not real name) is 28 years old. His problem started sometime in August 2013. He felt dizzy while cycling and wondered what went wrong. He had another episode in May 2014 after he exerted himself. Otherwise, John was a very active person who did a lot of running and cycling.

A chest CT angiogram on 25 May 2014 showed clotting and extensive blockage of the arteries in his lung. The next day John underwent an operation. Unfortunately “the tissue appeared to be organised and adherent to the vessel wall, that was difficult to remove the “clot” in the right pulmonary artery. Histopathology report showed thromboembolus, without evidence of neoplasia.”

(Note: Pulmonary embolism is a blockage in one of the pulmonary arteries in the lungs. In most cases, pulmonary embolism is caused by blood clots that travel to the lungs from the legs or, rarely, other parts of the body. This is then referred to as deep vein thrombosis).

John went home, after his hospitalization, with nine types of drugs: Warfarin, Lasix, Hydrochlorothiazide, Digoxin, Sildenafit, Pantoprazole, Enoxaparin and Xarelto. Everything went well for a while.

Some months later, problems cropped up again. Could it be a heart problem? In December 2014, on the recommendation of a close relative who is a medical specialist, John went to a renowned hospital in the US for further treatment.

On 2 January 2015, John underwent surgery again.  A large amount of proximal tumor was resected but some residual gelatinous material could not be removed. Intraoperative pathology was consistent with a sarcoma.

Two days after the operation, John developed fevers and remained critically ill in the ICU with right heart failure, acute kidney failure, liver failure and DIC (Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation … characterized by systemic activation of blood coagulation … leading to microvascular thrombi in various organs).

Fortunately, with aggressive supportive care John recovered and by the 13th day he was out of the ICU.

John was referred to an oncologist who suggested adjuvant chemotherapy with AIM (dexorubicin, ifosfamide and mesna).

The total cost of John’s US medical treatment was about USD 100,000.

John returned to Malaysia and went to a cancer hospital. He was similarly told that he would need chemotherapy, initially 3 cycles to see how he would respond to the treatment.

Somehow, John and his parents end up at CA Care Centre in early March 2015.

Our Advice

  1. Sarcoma is a rarely seen case at CA Care and it is difficult to handle. And sarcoma of the pulmonary (lung) artery is something we have not seen before. So, as far as CA Care is concerned, this is the first case.
  2. Make no mistake, we cannot cure any cancer. We may be able to help patients find their own healing. So we told John that if he is here and expect us to cure his cancer then this is not a right place to come.
  3. During our conversation, we were told that John’s close relative is a medical specialist. He was the one who made all the necessary arrangements for John’s medical treatment in Penang and the US. John himself is working in a medical-related profession.
  4. We posed one question: Since your close relative is a medical doctor, does he agree that you come here to seek our therapy? The answer was: No, he did not believe in alternative medicine!
  5. Our final advice: Please go home and discuss with all your family members what you want to do. We cannot cure your cancer. If you come here believing that we can offer you a cure then it is a mistake. But if you think that we can help you in any way, then you can come back again. Take time to think. There is no need to rush to make your decision.

Comment

This is indeed a hard case to handle. If you believe in medical treatment, then we would think the logical thing to do is go for chemotherapy — irrespective of whether you like it or not, or whether chemo would cure you or not!

It is “dangerous” for us to tell patients to take our herbs and follow our diet therapy if patients and their family members come to us wanting to find the “magic bullet.” We don’t have any magic bullet.

Let us pose one question here: What … after following our therapy, the cancer does not go way?” Are we going to be blamed — held responsible and made a scapegoat? After all, to most people, alternative medicine is unproven, unscientific and just quackery!

Our core belief in handling cancer is that: We cannot cure you. You cure yourself.  We guide and provide you with the tools for your healing journey. But ultimately you are responsibility for your own healing. We know this is something not all patients who come to us understand or are looking for. They want us to cure them!

We tell John up front that this is the first time we hear of lung artery sarcoma. Such confession would be enough to make most patients run away! It is better to be crystal clear from the start that we are here to help you, not to mislead you.

However, let us share with you one success story — another equally rare sarcoma case which we had seen for the first time.

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Comic available at: http://bookoncancer.com/productDetail.php?P_Id=73

We are indeed surprised that we could help this lady. It has been almost 3 years now and she is still doing fine. During the last visit, she came to our centre with three medical doctors. One of them is her sister! I asked the patient in front of her sister: When you first came to see us, you refused chemotherapy and opted for herbs. Did you sister ever objected to you following our therapy? Her answer: Yes, she strongly objected.

Seeing and experiencing it is to believe. Now, her sister and two other medical doctors came to seek our help because they believed in what they saw!

Why are we able to help this patient? When the patient first came to seek our help, she was helpless. Deep in my heart I felt hopeless but I kept that to myself. I told the patient, I cannot cure your cancer. I can only do my best to help you. Did she run away upon hearing this? Most patients would but not this patient. She knew what she did not want to do — I don’t want chemo! She wanted to follow our therapy. No two ways about that. She did not doubt what she wanted. She was determined and committed to find healing for herself. She did not come to seek the non-existent magic bullet. Let us celebrate and praise God for this wonderful blessing. She had found her healing.

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